Author Topic: Pot Metal Prep ~ 1/4 extensions, Headlamp housings and Misc. Body Color Pieces  (Read 754 times)

Offline 67gtasanjose

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I have my S.J. 67's "pot metal pieces" all stripped of paint and original primers. I noted NO RED OXIDE primers, only light grey primers (or no primers) under the body color pieces.

Here is the list of pot metal items I have stripped & wish to prep for painting at a "future date unknown":
Quarter Extensions:
Headlight Housings & Trim Rings:
Quarter Vents (lower, coupe has no uppers)
Hood Louver Inserts (& grilles)
Turn Housings

Should I shoot them all Red Oxide Sealer (and eventually high build primer when closer to paint)? Any special prep for individual parts listed for best adhesion? Should I simply go to what the factory looked to do with JUST the high-build grey primer? It will likely be next spring for the body color but don't want the bare pot metal sitting around if it may cause potential "issues". I can also simply set them asside in the heated home or at work WITHOUT DOING ANYTHING at this time too.

Ideas?
Richard Urch

1967 (11/2/66, S.J.) Luxury Coupe, 289-4V w/Thermactor Emissions, C-4, Well Optioned
2005 (04/05) GT Premium Convertible, Windveil Blue, Parchment Top w/Med. Parchment interior,  Roush Body Appointments

Offline J_Speegle

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Would not suggest high build up primers or surfacers unless your trying to hide imperfections (then you might want to look for others) or body work. If you do it will reduce the highlights and details IMHO

Since these don't rust I would put off the coating until it get closer to the time. Time will just increase the time to scratch or ding the part and you'll need to strip and recoat again.

Just me
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline 67gtasanjose

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Would not suggest high build up primers or surfacers unless your trying to hide imperfections (then you might want to look for others) or body work. If you do it will reduce the highlights and details IMHO

Since these don't rust I would put off the coating until it get closer to the time. Time will just increase the time to scratch or ding the part and you'll need to strip and recoat again.

Just me

Thanks Jeff, this follows what I was thinking (putting it off, nothing easier than procrastination, right? ;) )

When the day arrives to prep, I assume there needs to primer on these pot metal pieces. What then would be a good choice and "how" then should it be done? (off the car or extensions & headlight housings bolted down to car to ensure good alignment?)

Just fielding ideas since this will be my first "concours" paint job and "painting cars" for me, though something I have done many times before, it has been many years now (with the exception of shooting some "Tractor Supply" acrylic enamel paint outdoors last fall onto my snowplow truck...bugs and all!)

Maybe a thread to point me towards on the body preparations? Now the body work itself,  I have a fairly good skill with but when it comes to a sort of step-by-step process of beginning with a concourse correctly "sealed" body with all dents, dings and incorrect holes filled, everything shaped and primed, what is a good leveling process? I thought the use of a high build would have helped, notabley in the repaired areas. I understand the concept of "less is better" but I do not wish to spend 12 more years getting to the "paint" stage either.
Richard Urch

1967 (11/2/66, S.J.) Luxury Coupe, 289-4V w/Thermactor Emissions, C-4, Well Optioned
2005 (04/05) GT Premium Convertible, Windveil Blue, Parchment Top w/Med. Parchment interior,  Roush Body Appointments

Offline Bob Gaines

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Thanks Jeff, this follows what I was thinking (putting it off, nothing easier than procrastination, right? ;) )

When the day arrives to prep, I assume there needs to primer on these pot metal pieces. What then would be a good choice and "how" then should it be done? (off the car or extensions & headlight housings bolted down to car to ensure good alignment?)

Just fielding ideas since this will be my first "concours" paint job and "painting cars" for me, though something I have done many times before, it has been many years now (with the exception of shooting some "Tractor Supply" acrylic enamel paint outdoors last fall onto my snowplow truck...bugs and all!)

Maybe a thread to point me towards on the body preparations? Now the body work itself,  I have a fairly good skill with but when it comes to a sort of step-by-step process of beginning with a concourse correctly "sealed" body with all dents, dings and incorrect holes filled, everything shaped and primed, what is a good leveling process? I thought the use of a high build would have helped, notabley in the repaired areas. I understand the concept of "less is better" but I do not wish to spend 12 more years getting to the "paint" stage either.
Part of the issue is knowing what top coat paint system is going to be used in the final painting. Many paint systems have specific primers that are best to be used depending on paint system or brand. You can void the warranty by using the wrong primer for a given top coat paint product. With out that information it is hard to give further informed direction.
Bob Gaines,Shelby enthusiast, Shelby collector , Shelby concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby

Offline 67gtasanjose

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Part of the issue is knowing what top coat paint system is going to be used in the final painting. Many paint systems have specific primers that are best to be used depending on paint system or brand. You can void the warranty by using the wrong primer for a given top coat paint product. With out that information it is hard to give further informed direction.

Plan is to use PPG  BC/CC
At present, the "body" or shell of the car is media blasted, covered 2 light coats of PPG red oxide epoxy sealer and ready to begin tackling the body work (dents & dings),  working panel by panel till all areas are ready for the leveling step. My question is simply asking what should I use along the way to cover the "body work" as I work towards the final leveling (block sanding) of those repaired areas.

That's enough for now, this should keep me busy through the winter days.

I'm not sure I answered enough there but hopefully with a bit of guidance, I'll not make too much extra work for myself. Last full repaint about 11 years ago on a Buick Regal I did...I finished all of my body work, then shot sealer on it and went in for the night...read the "directions" the next day only to find out that the sealer needed to be IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWED by color coat or I'd have to wait 30 days! Bail out on that mistake was a full sanding again and yet a 2nd coat of sealer followed immediately by the color coat, about a 4-6 hours more of sanding and a mere $125 more product. Hoping to not duplicate such errors.
Richard Urch

1967 (11/2/66, S.J.) Luxury Coupe, 289-4V w/Thermactor Emissions, C-4, Well Optioned
2005 (04/05) GT Premium Convertible, Windveil Blue, Parchment Top w/Med. Parchment interior,  Roush Body Appointments

Offline Bob Gaines

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Plan is to use PPG  BC/CC
At present, the "body" or shell of the car is media blasted, covered 2 light coats of PPG red oxide epoxy sealer and ready to begin tackling the body work (dents & dings),  working panel by panel till all areas are ready for the leveling step. My question is simply asking what should I use along the way to cover the "body work" as I work towards the final leveling (block sanding) of those repaired areas.

That's enough for now, this should keep me busy through the winter days.

I'm not sure I answered enough there but hopefully with a bit of guidance, I'll not make too much extra work for myself. Last full repaint about 11 years ago on a Buick Regal I did...I finished all of my body work, then shot sealer on it and went in for the night...read the "directions" the next day only to find out that the sealer needed to be IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWED by color coat or I'd have to wait 30 days! Bail out on that mistake was a full sanding again and yet a 2nd coat of sealer followed immediately by the color coat, about a 4-6 hours more of sanding and a mere $125 more product. Hoping to not duplicate such errors.
It should be easy enough to get counsel from the local PPG rep given they would be the ones to contact if (heaven forbid) there was paint failure of any kind.
Bob Gaines,Shelby enthusiast, Shelby collector , Shelby concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby

Offline J_Speegle

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If you choose to coat them now you might consider (don't know how long it will be until paint) that things and products may change between now and then and what you planned on using might be unavailable, illegal or reformulated by the time it get to paint time

Just a consideration
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline midlife

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Would not suggest high build up primers or surfacers unless your trying to hide imperfections (then you might want to look for others) or body work. If you do it will reduce the highlights and details IMHO

Since these don't rust I would put off the coating until it get closer to the time. Time will just increase the time to scratch or ding the part and you'll need to strip and recoat again.

Just me

Pot metal won't rust?  News to me...maybe not like rolled steel but there is oxidation that takes place.

Offline J_Speegle

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Pot metal won't rust?  News to me...maybe not like rolled steel but there is oxidation that takes place.

Agree that it won't rust but will oxide in the right conditions. Have had bare port metal parts sitting out in the weather for 10 plus years that has not had this issue but on a working engine some have.

Understand that rust is oxidation just like fire is - just not what many of us think of when we think of when we use the term "rust" to describe the changes that take place
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)