Author Topic: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car  (Read 854 times)

Offline redmach69

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Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« on: November 07, 2016, 04:12:36 PM »
Hi guys, first post in a long while. I have acquired a 1970 mach 1, I knew it was an original old car but I am finding myself surprised by how original. The man I got it from said 21,000 miles to look at the car I thought 121,ooo but still original. 95% original paint, original seats and carpet, it reminded me of how you saw these cars in the late seventies, you know not perfect pristine cars but largely original and complete, if tired. Well when I started looking it has all the stickers and tags still in place, the original plug wires and hoses, even the bypass hose and the clamps are painted blue, voltage regulator battery cables all untouched, chalk marks on the radiator support and rear end etc. Now my problem is this, when do you not touch a car like this? It is not drivable as is, all I wanted to do was clean it up, change the fluids, tune it up and drive it as the survivor it is. But now I wonder if I start replacing even wear items am I doing a disservice to the car and the hobby? But I don't want a museum piece that I can't drive. What are your ideas on this topic. I know Bloomington recommends that some corvettes be left untouched as reference cars, is there a similar idea about mustangs?
 Thanks

Offline Brian Conway

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2016, 05:11:49 PM »
Anything unique or special about your car ?  Got a Marti for it yet ?  My 69 is one of 3,388.  Brian
5RO9A GT  4 Spd Built 5/29/65
9TO2R SCJ 4 Spd Built 9/19/68
San Diego, Ca.

Offline Bob Gaines

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2016, 06:23:07 PM »
Hi guys, first post in a long while. I have acquired a 1970 mach 1, I knew it was an original old car but I am finding myself surprised by how original. The man I got it from said 21,000 miles to look at the car I thought 121,ooo but still original. 95% original paint, original seats and carpet, it reminded me of how you saw these cars in the late seventies, you know not perfect pristine cars but largely original and complete, if tired. Well when I started looking it has all the stickers and tags still in place, the original plug wires and hoses, even the bypass hose and the clamps are painted blue, voltage regulator battery cables all untouched, chalk marks on the radiator support and rear end etc. Now my problem is this, when do you not touch a car like this? It is not drivable as is, all I wanted to do was clean it up, change the fluids, tune it up and drive it as the survivor it is. But now I wonder if I start replacing even wear items am I doing a disservice to the car and the hobby? But I don't want a museum piece that I can't drive. What are your ideas on this topic. I know Bloomington recommends that some corvettes be left untouched as reference cars, is there a similar idea about mustangs?
 Thanks
Some people replace wear items with better condition used wear items to maintain the consistent patina. I would not waste your time doing this for battery or tires but most everything else shouldn't be as much of a problem relatively speaking. It will be harder then calling a 1 800 number to get parts or local autoparts store. Of course changing brake fluild ,rebuilding master cylinders ,wheel cylinder etc. Will have to be done to make safe drive able. I know of those that boil out the gas tank and coat it inside instead of replacing it for survivor originality. Definitely harder then replacing with one of the good replacement tanks. The trick is to disguise any visible work to blend in to the surroundings and not look new.   You will have to be the ultimate judge since it is your car and what will give you the most pleasure.  Whether you decide to try and maintain the patina or do a resto there are people here that are willing to help.
Bob Gaines,Shelby enthusiast, Shelby collector , Shelby concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby

Offline VikingNJ

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2016, 09:27:42 AM »
Hello, congrats on your find. First, IMHO I would document by photos and writings the whole car for your records and the mustang collecting community. Its these type of cars that provide so much needed detail & information for the rest of the mustang community to follow. Your car might be able to determine details never remembered or known before. I would replace all things that are old, dried like belts and hoses with new reproduction and store the pieces you take off. As you said you want to drive it and enjoy it, not have a trailer queen. Keep as is as long as you possibly can. Best always to keep in garage. Maybe let other well respected mustang historians look it over.

Main thing... Enjoy your car.

Offline 67gtasanjose

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2016, 11:53:09 AM »
SAVE EVERYTHING! Do not throw away anything that came with the car. It can be proved or disproved later if need-be, but I guarranty that anything you get rid of today, you will more than likely regret (or any future owners will regret you have) later on.
Richard Urch

1967 (11/2/66, S.J.) Luxury Coupe, 289-4V w/Thermactor Emissions, C-4, Well Optioned
2005 (04/05) GT Premium Convertible, Windveil Blue, Parchment Top w/Med. Parchment interior,  Roush Body Appointments

Offline redmach69

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2016, 04:01:12 PM »
Finally some pics. Also I removed the back seat and there was the buildsheet.

Offline svo2scj

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2016, 06:29:05 PM »
Hello
Well you described your car "TO A T" - and seeing your photos it is a jem AMONG all the "catalog restorations" out there !

The car LOOKS great for the paint and interior and I think that helps your decision (as if it would worse you would be restoring)!   The engine compartment is worse for ware -BUT just how these things look after 50 years!

I THINK you are right to "put the car right" for driving!   Fluids, hoses and safety items (tires/brakes/exhaust). AND I think you could do that "WITHOUT RESTORING UNDER THE HOOD".   The reason I say that is it is hard to go 1/2 way! OR if you thought "I'll touch up the weather areas...next thing IT LOOKS LIKE YOU TOUCHED UP THE WEATHER AREAS!"   (picture your car with a set of NEW REPRO paint stickers - STICKING OUT LIKE A SORE THUMB)

So many collectors have "restored" cars that today we look for survivors!  (And now that term is being misused by marketers)  I think this is great.   I think you will be able to find enough fun just going through the process.

Mark
P.S.  Just remember to do the brake proportioning valve when you do the brakes !
1969 R Code , Sportsroof (non Mach) W Axle
AB , Standard Interior  San Jose built 4/22/1969

Offline 67gtasanjose

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2016, 06:55:05 PM »
again...and I cannot over emphasize this. ANYTHING and EVERYTHING you remove, do not follow any temptation to market it or dispose of it. SAVE IT! Your car looks JUST LIKE my 67 did in 78, ONLY BETTER! About the same mileage and all. I did what you are talking about doing to this one and I began replacing the "wear" items (hoses, clamps, idler arm, strut bushings and the list goes on. Bottom line is, now today when ACTUALLY RESTORING THE CAR, no longer that daily driver...I need everything I threw away or "traded up" with,  back again! Another example, I replaced the deck lid because it was "easier to repaint and it was FREE", so now my date code is off. Silly things along those lines that I would not have thought mattered AT ALL at that time.  (No "UNDO" button on such decisions)

Enjoy, and if you feel you want rid of it AS-IS, lemme know ;)
« Last Edit: December 14, 2016, 06:57:26 PM by 67gtasanjose »
Richard Urch

1967 (11/2/66, S.J.) Luxury Coupe, 289-4V w/Thermactor Emissions, C-4, Well Optioned
2005 (04/05) GT Premium Convertible, Windveil Blue, Parchment Top w/Med. Parchment interior,  Roush Body Appointments

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2016, 08:52:21 PM »
Would be helpful to others if we knew where and when the car was built ;)

Many members also add it to their signature so its in any response or post you make.
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline redmach69

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2016, 11:32:02 AM »
Hi Jeff and everyone, it is an Oct 1969 build at Metuchen NJ ordered out of the Charlotte district 22. Here a some more pics.

Offline Smokey 15

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Re: Opinions about how to proceed on a survivor car
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2016, 04:20:25 PM »
 Nice car.  I had the same issue with a very low mile (3,256) '72 Mercury. I took very detailed pics of everything. I replaced the wear items with date coded parts. I ziplock bagged everything I took off. Even had the original oil filter. The unfortunate part was that I had to repaint the car (used factory paint), because it was damaged when it was new. Don't think it was ever titled. It sat from '72 'til I bought it in '98.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2016, 04:25:45 PM by Smokey 15 »