Author Topic: Another Evaporust question  (Read 464 times)

Offline BKnapp

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Another Evaporust question
« on: February 18, 2017, 08:10:30 PM »
I am in the process of cleaning up some parts and am wondering if I can soak the entire idler arm assembly in evaporust? Will I run into problems with it degrading the grease in the bearing or anything? The same question for the fan clutch. I worry about soaking moving parts in evaporust.

Thanks!
Bill

1967 390 Coupe A/T  P/S  P/B. (S.J. Built 1/4/1967)  7R01S145xxx
2007 Shelby GT500 40th Anniv.  Convert. #125

Offline Bob Gaines

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Re: Another Evaporust question
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2017, 11:44:10 PM »
I am in the process of cleaning up some parts and am wondering if I can soak the entire idler arm assembly in evaporust? Will I run into problems with it degrading the grease in the bearing or anything? The same question for the fan clutch. I worry about soaking moving parts in evaporust.

Thanks!
The possibility exists that the plating or shiny surface will be degraded on the metal sleeve of the bushing after being exposed to the evaporust. There is no bearing or grease in a idler arm to harm.  I will be surprised if the idler arm does not have cracked rubber bushing if it has never been rebuilt. If the rubber is dry rotting at the least it will not look new at the worst it needs rebuilt. The rubber needs to be soft enough to twist and snap back.  The rubber bushings that press into the cast steel arm have a shiny steel outer casing. 
Bob Gaines,Shelby enthusiast, Shelby collector , Shelby concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby

Offline jwc66k

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Re: Another Evaporust question
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2017, 12:59:18 PM »
I am in the process of cleaning up some parts and am wondering if I can soak the entire idler arm assembly in evaporust?
I would remove the bushing first, with the intent on replacing it, then do the Evaporust steps.
Read the warning on the jug - you got a week or two before rust sets in.
The same question for the fan clutch. I worry about soaking moving parts in evaporust.
Any liquid, Evaporust included, will get into a moving assembly. The instructions include a rinse in water after an Evaporust treatment. As far as I'm concerned, that is a recipe for more rust. What I've considered, but haven't tried, is to use brake cleaner to blast out any remaining water on a moving assembly. I would not use a spray oil (Wd-40) unless you are at the final step, aka done (no paint, no plating, etc).
Jim
I promise to be politically correct in all my posts to keep the BBBB from vociferating.