Author Topic: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly  (Read 6907 times)

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2013, 11:51:55 PM »
Some bolts and head markings that might help someone in the future

Caliper bolts




#2 Cross member (the tubular one under the oil pan) bolt

Jeff Speegle

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Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2014, 11:23:21 PM »
Catching up on some details I had pictures of but had not posted. Hope these help someone at some point ;)


One of the motor mounts. Unfortunately its splitting from age





Strut rod washers and the markings/color we believe indicated to line workers that bigger/wider tires





Strut rod bushing insert - Original was two piece as shown in the picture at the bottom left





#2 Cross member retaining bolt head marking





Caliper to spindle bolts




 

Brake distribution block and valve






Markings. Block dates shows 24  03  9  - March 24 69. About a month before build date





Original front brake lines with markings





Brake line ends - appears that they might be from two different suppliers. Notice stamping differences.
Dates (top) 09  04  9      April 9  69  - (bottom) 20 12 8   Dec 20 68

« Last Edit: April 04, 2014, 11:36:25 PM by J_Speegle »
Jeff Speegle

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Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2014, 12:37:48 AM »
Was under the car the other day cleaning and thought I would take some shots while cleaning before the new exhaust from Scott Fuller gets here

Forward floor area
with Sound deadener application. Still don't understand why they would add the weight to a Boss with standard interior. Not the only one I've seen  ???

Oh that is how it is/was. The worker got a little closer to the center and the driveline tunnel on the one side. Notice the cool shadow left from the front seat belt anchor. Something you only get with a single pass a an applicator wand. Likely will not see that on a restored car :(








Filler panel between the wheelwell and the frame rail at the rear. Nice little shot of sound deadener from the wheel well application. Mix of floor and body color. Note the rear wheel wells have been rattle canned by a PO




Rear shackle, frame and cross member area





Area over the rear end showing the extra cross member welding and sealer (as well as the staggered shock modifications) of an early Boss 302






Shot of the rearend/3rd member. Its been out, fresh dyed nuts and a repo K Marti axle tag have been added. Don't know where the original tag went to :(





Jeff Speegle

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Offline mwizz

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2014, 09:32:29 AM »
Thanks for recording this. it will be a terrific reference.

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2014, 06:06:38 PM »
Thanks for recording this. it will be a terrific reference.

That's the plan - of course anyone thinking of using information and details from this example should make sure their car is from the same plant, time and options and reference other examples to secure reasoning and documentation for making choices for their restoration
Jeff Speegle

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Offline Armond

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2014, 03:10:56 PM »
Great pictures! Thanks Jeff!
MCA#31064

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2017, 04:38:54 PM »
Since the subject of strut rod bushings came up in another thread and I uploaded a bunch of pictures of the originals I removed from this car I thought it would best serve the members that they get posted here so that others using the search feature could find them here

Face of front strut rod washer and bushing. Seen a few rattle can passes of black paint over its short 30K miles  :( But it did protect the finish under the black. You can still make out the blue (often found teal also) peeking out through a chip or two int he black




Back side of the bushing assembly - more black rattle can




After the lip of the inner steel liner was removed with a careful application of a small grinder and some hand tools the assembly (minus front bushing) reassembled to show the order and direction of each bushing as found on car.




Both longer and shorter inner steel liners together




Just the shorter liner. Notice the small amount of markings on the lip of the liner at the bottom




Front and rear washers (painted is the forward washer) Front washer shows a "flying" F in a circle




C8OA-3A140B rubber insulator markings




Inverted T and a HOC (possibly supplier) markings




Engineering numbers




C8OA-3A225A rubber insulator markings (bottom most is the original)








Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline Bob Gaines

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2017, 07:40:48 PM »
Here is a example of a new take off or lunch pail part "teal" strut rod washer.
Bob Gaines,Shelby enthusiast, Shelby collector , Shelby concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2017, 06:43:41 PM »
Some pictures of the original ball joint rivets found on this example. Believe current (in the pictures tone/color of the rivet has changed over the years and through the cleaning process)

Upper A arm - top of rivet


Upper A arm - bottom of rivet


Lower A arm - top of rivet


Lower A arm - bottom of rivet
Jeff Speegle

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Offline specialed

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2017, 11:10:43 AM »
Jeff as nice as that undercarriage is I would just clean it as you would have a hard time finding one that nice here in the NE anyway. Your n-case snubber bracket is the early type not the 69 bottom trimmed back type did it get changed somehow or a factory mistake?  Also I see those bell spacers used on the back-up light stud nuts in your pic & I never see them used on 69-70dearborn cars but have found them on SJ cars?

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #25 on: January 27, 2017, 05:54:05 PM »
Jeff as nice as that undercarriage is I would just clean it as you would have a hard time finding one that nice here in the NE anyway.

Yes its nice though I do have a little overspray from the repaints I've sort fo just left it alone considering my current use for the car. Its nice to have even bare surfaces of the undercarriage where the jets of paint didn't get to still unrusted. Mostly on frame rail sides and corners. The factory galvanizing of these panels sure ahve done their job



 
Your n-case snubber bracket is the early type not the 69 bottom trimmed back type did it get changed somehow or a factory mistake?

No likely I just grabbed one from the pile 25 plus years ago when I put the car together. When I got it much had been taken off the car and stored in shipping containers with a ton of parts from other cars. So when it came time to buy the car (you know the game) it was grab this and that without always taking the time to make sure everything date was correct. Was in a rush given how the sale took place, the location and such. So grabbed a top loader from the pile of 20 or so. Grab an N case ...........

Will change the bracket to the correct one now that I need to change out the gears for the original 3.91's that I need with the original type of trans I installed when I put the original engine back in this time.  We've come a long way since the early 90's and before


Also I see those bell spacers used on the back-up light stud nuts in your pic & I never see them used on 69-70dearborn cars but have found them on SJ cars?

Goo eye and thanks for bring that up and making others aware of that Likely just like the bracket above - grabbed what was handy and for me that would have been San Jose stuff so will change that back out when I get a chance  ::)
Jeff Speegle

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Offline DKutz

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #26 on: January 27, 2017, 06:24:48 PM »
two questions.

Its still has ORIGINAL Brake Lines!!???

I would not even know where to start on this restoration, (other than a lot of research) BUT how do you restore some of this?  Like the rubber suspension pieces?  On  a standard mustang you would just buy replacement parts.  For a BOSS I would assume you would need NOS?  At 47 years old even NOS rubber has got to be bad.  So how do you restore those areas?

1965 Mustang Fastback 'A' Code, silver Blue Met, Med blue int. Auto, San Jose, 10/8/64 #1449**

Gone but not forgotten - 1996 Mustang GT

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #27 on: January 27, 2017, 10:32:33 PM »
two questions.

Its still has ORIGINAL Brake Lines!!???

Believe all but maybe one of my cars still have their original front and rear brake lines (think the Boss's rear is original but likely from my CJ I had)

I would not even know where to start on this restoration, (other than a lot of research) BUT how do you restore some of this?  Like the rubber suspension pieces?

Just inspect to see if they are usable, clean and freshen up the metal area, treat with your favorite dressings and put back on if it fits your planned usage for the car. If you can't you look for other examples, get someone to reproduce (or look into doing them yourself) or live with the best you can find until something better comes along


  On  a standard mustang you would just buy replacement parts.  For a BOSS I would assume you would need NOS?  At 47 years old even NOS rubber has got to be bad.  So how do you restore those areas?

No NOS is rarely the perfect answer since allot of "NOS" versions (in this case the flex lines) are the double crimped, markings differ and dates will likely not match. Believe currently these "later" versions are being reproduced

Older posting from Dave Davis a member here


http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/index.php?topic=5380.msg30306#msg30306


Jeff Speegle

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Offline DKutz

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #28 on: January 27, 2017, 10:41:40 PM »
Engine compartment black is on so time for reassembly



Did try out something new, I reapplied the writing found on the radiator support with crayon again. Since I'm using newer paint with hardener its present look is more of day one - rather than maybe day 90 but we'll see what happens. Surely a different effect than under single stage original paint

Did shot a test panel to play with - might try tracing the letters with a brush and acid to see if I can get the crayon to break through and what ever takes place next




If the wax numbers are supposed to come through the paint, could you bush over them with grease or vaseline to keep the paint off?
1965 Mustang Fastback 'A' Code, silver Blue Met, Med blue int. Auto, San Jose, 10/8/64 #1449**

Gone but not forgotten - 1996 Mustang GT

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 69 Boss 302 Disassembly
« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2017, 11:08:45 PM »
If the wax numbers are supposed to come through the paint, could you bush over them with grease or vaseline to keep the paint off?

Depends on if your looking for the ten year old look or as delivered I would guess. Don't recall every seeing day one pictures where the marks are visible. Currently (after a couple years sitting around. The texture of the marks and a few pencil tip sized edges of the crayon is visible. Pretty happy with the experiment and will likely reused the practice on real restorations. So dislike (besides it not being original looking) the marks that should be under paint applied to other wise nicely done cars

Just me ;)
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)