Author Topic: Phosphating 101 -  (Read 9537 times)

Offline preaction

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #30 on: March 27, 2016, 12:14:09 AM »
By the way I did my first phosphate  today and the parts came out great the biggest pieces being hood hinges and I followed your procedure and I couldn't ask for a better finished product thanks for all of your posting on this subject Jim.  ;)
8R02S125064- January 6 1968  SJ   7F93S591808 - April 28 1967  Dearborn   7F91S544039 - December 17 1966 Dearborn

Offline jwc66k

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #31 on: March 27, 2016, 01:43:21 AM »
Glad I could help.
Jim
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Online Brian Conway

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #32 on: May 07, 2016, 03:32:20 PM »
OK so I gotta ask the dumb question.  I read early on ' bead blast everything '  really ?  Pictures are of the hood hinges that I have cleaned, used paint remover on, wire brushed and went over with steel wool.  The original  greyish phosphate finish covers most of the parts with some discolored staining on some areas.  For the most part rust and grease are gone.  Is bare metal the desired surface prior to the new P & O application ?  Thanks, Brian
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Offline Bob Gaines

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2016, 03:46:24 PM »
OK so I gotta ask the dumb question.  I read early on ' bead blast everything '  really ?  Pictures are of the hood hinges that I have cleaned, used paint remover on, wire brushed and went over with steel wool.  The original  greyish phosphate finish covers most of the parts with some discolored staining on some areas.  For the most part rust and grease are gone. Is bare metal the desired surface prior to the new P & O application ?  Thanks, Brian
Plating doesn't happen very well if at all even over light grease or rust. More likely then not you will get inconsistent results if you don't bead blast prior to zinc phosphating. With fresh bead blasting prior to cooking you are lessening the chance of splotchy plating . FYI in case you didn't figure it out wear rubber gloves (i use the med exam gloves ) while handling the parts so oil from your skin doesn't contaminate the part.
Bob Gaines,Shelby enthusiast, Shelby collector , Shelby concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby

Offline jwc66k

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #34 on: May 07, 2016, 05:17:24 PM »
OK so I gotta ask the dumb question.  I read early on ' bead blast everything '  really ?  Pictures are of the hood hinges that I have cleaned, used paint remover on, wire brushed and went over with steel wool.  The original  greyish phosphate finish covers most of the parts with some discolored staining on some areas.  For the most part rust and grease are gone.  Is bare metal the desired surface prior to the new P & O application ?  Thanks, Brian
Plating doesn't happen very well if at all even over light grease or rust. More likely then not you will get inconsistent results if you don't bead blast prior to zinc phosphating. With fresh bead blasting prior to cooking you are lessening the chance of splotchy plating . FYI in case you didn't figure it out wear rubber gloves (i use the med exam gloves ) while handling the parts so oil from your skin doesn't contaminate the part.
Wire brushing does not get into the moving areas on hinges and latches. Bead blasting does, at least it does a better job. Grease still needs to be removed and it's better to do that before blasting. Soaking is a solvent of your choice (no smoking and fasten your seat belts if you do) is the best way.
Bob stated the grease and consistency problems. That's the real goal - consistency. As to grease, if you don't remove all of it prior to blasting you might spread it around with the beads and air making the items surface worse. For handling, I use a dry shop towel from the blast cabinet to the "to be phosphated area" - it's a quick move and then it's back to blasting. Rubber gloves are best when actually putting item into and taking them out of the phosphate bath. Careful - if you're doing this correctly, the phosphate bath is 180 to 210F.
Each time I get ready I walk thru the process - blast; stage (is it dry); blackening (for bolts); phosphating SST pan; Stove; propane for stove; tools, hooks, strainers all SST; rinse water (I use a 15 gallon galvanized wash tub); drying hooks (bent coathangers); towels for bolts and things that don't "hook"; oiling area (I use the top from a 30 gallon plastic trash can with several sheets of newspaper and a couple of shop towels); WD-40; watch (some parts need to be light, some need to be dark); beer (I know I left out something, so I'll do it again).
A tip on bead blasting - start on the inside edges like on a hood latch, and work your way out. Concentrate on hard to see spots, holes and edges first, the flat areas will take care of themselves.
Jim
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Online Brian Conway

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #35 on: May 07, 2016, 07:37:19 PM »
[quote author=Brian Conway   Is bare metal the desired surface prior to the new P & O application ?  Thanks, Brian

Thanks fellas;  so the answer to the question is yes, bare metal.  About the grease;  a gasoline bath, a follow up with carb spray cleaner and using a toothbrush, q-tips and tooth picks does a pretty through job. 
« Last Edit: May 07, 2016, 07:40:59 PM by Brian Conway »
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Offline Bob Gaines

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #36 on: May 07, 2016, 09:23:28 PM »
[quote author=Brian Conway   Is bare metal the desired surface prior to the new P & O application ?  Thanks, Brian

Thanks fellas;  so the answer to the question is yes, bare metal.  About the grease;  a gasoline bath, a follow up with carb spray cleaner and using a toothbrush, q-tips and tooth picks does a pretty through job.
I guess you don't have a bead blaster.
Bob Gaines,Shelby enthusiast, Shelby collector , Shelby concours judge SAAC,MCA,Mid America Shelby

Online Brian Conway

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #37 on: May 07, 2016, 10:24:42 PM »
No I don't have one.  I sorta have access to a couple but really hate to be a bother and don't like having to ask.  I'll figure something out.  Brian

Well got it figured out.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2016, 05:59:47 PM by Brian Conway »
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Online Bossbill

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #38 on: December 05, 2017, 12:50:11 AM »
I've begun this process using most of Jim's excellent processes.
I really like the funnel idea for sandblasting small parts.

I was ready to try this today, so the locally available  Klean-Strip Phosphoric Prep and Etch and Denatured Alcohol idea worked out real well.
I'm not so thrilled with using motor oil and will try WD instead. Maybe buy a gallon and dip parts instead of spraying.

Here's one of my first efforts, the hood catch:
[try again with pic, this time a download to this site]
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 02:04:20 PM by Bossbill »
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Offline carlite65

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #39 on: December 05, 2017, 08:55:55 AM »
your pic did not come thru for me. just a blank square.
5F09C331248

Offline caspian65

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #40 on: December 05, 2017, 10:04:55 AM »
Soaking in motor oil is a bit messy.  What I do is soak for 24 hours, wipe off the excess, then clean with dish washing detergent and a tooth-brush in warm water.  This will not remove the oil from the surface.  Follow with whatever rust inhibitor you like.
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Online Bossbill

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #41 on: December 05, 2017, 02:06:52 PM »
Thanks for the tip, Charles. I'll also see what Boeshield does after oiling. I'm in a test phase with this whole process right now. Too much time in the phosphate soup appears to obscure details on the bolt head.

Picture has been downloaded here instead of using a link to Google's cloud. I'll do either that or link to Flicker account from now on.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 02:53:31 PM by Bossbill »
Bill
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Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Phosphating 101 -
« Reply #42 on: December 05, 2017, 02:43:04 PM »
I've always thought that one of the important thing was to fill the pores and if metal can "soak" up the oil give it the opportunity.  I've often reheated the finished metal to remove any moisture then soak the parts in a 5 gallon light gear oil bucket I got at the parts house.  After the soil I do a similar process to Charles then treat it with one of the fancy micro oils - currently Boeshield. Of course our conditions are much kinder in this part of the country
Jeff Speegle

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