Author Topic: NOS shock paint markings  (Read 1650 times)

Offline 1969 Cale II

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NOS shock paint markings
« on: February 18, 2015, 12:29:00 AM »
How many people here have gotten nos shocks that had paint marks on them? I have 3 different ones for my Cyclone and the paint is brushed on and it is FLAT not gloss. On suspension parts you can tell it had a gloss, but these shocks are flat. How are the mustang shocks done? Generally speaking.

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: NOS shock paint markings
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2015, 05:54:56 PM »
How many people here have gotten nos shocks that had paint marks on them? I have 3 different ones for my Cyclone and the paint is brushed on and it is FLAT not gloss. On suspension parts you can tell it had a gloss, but these shocks are flat. How are the mustang shocks done? Generally speaking.

Have seen the markings typically done in a semi-gloss finish. Would not surprise me to find them either in a  flatter or shinier finish since this was likley just the cheapest marking paints the outside vendor could find to use for the purpose.  Also consider if your comparing NOS ones the elements that the part was exposed to, box rub or sitting  as well as other things could effect what finish we are seeing 40-50 years later  Just a thought
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline krelboyne

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Re: NOS shock paint markings
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2015, 06:15:19 PM »
Additionally NOS parts may or may not be exactly like assembly line parts.
Scott Behncke - Carcheaologist
West Coast Classic Cougars
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1968 GT/CS 302-4V San Jose 05B
1968 Cougar XR7 Dearborn 09A

Offline WT8095

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Re: NOS shock paint markings
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2015, 09:38:57 PM »
...the cheapest marking paints the outside vendor could find to use for the purpose...

This is straying a bit from the original topic, but were paint marks on suspension components generally applied by the part manufacturer, or after they were received at Ford? Or did this vary by year, part, plant, supplier, etc.?
Dave Z.

'68 fastback, S-code + C6. Special Paint (Rainbow promotion), DSO 710784. Actual build date 2/7/1968, San Jose.
'69 Cougar convertible, 351W-2V + FMX, Meadowlark Yellow.

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: NOS shock paint markings
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2015, 08:07:53 PM »
This is straying a bit from the original topic, but were paint marks on suspension components generally applied by the part manufacturer, or after they were received at Ford?

By and at the supplier, contractor or sub contractor



Or did this vary by year, part, plant, supplier, etc.?

Pretty consistent in general it appears though a new supplier coming into the system or one dropping out for a particular plant would make a difference

With that said the specifications for marking could change for all suppliers of a particular part of spelled out in the specifications and a change. Sometimes a paint mark indicated a campaign part or a new and improved part after a problem or issue with earlier parts.
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline WT8095

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Re: NOS shock paint markings
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2015, 10:12:27 PM »
Sometimes a paint mark indicated a campaign part or a new and improved part after a problem or issue with earlier parts.
What's a campaign part? I haven't heard that term before.
Dave Z.

'68 fastback, S-code + C6. Special Paint (Rainbow promotion), DSO 710784. Actual build date 2/7/1968, San Jose.
'69 Cougar convertible, 351W-2V + FMX, Meadowlark Yellow.

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: NOS shock paint markings
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2015, 10:30:50 PM »
What's a campaign part? I haven't heard that term before.

Ford in house term for what we now call a recall. The "campaign" was the process to announce, supply the parts to the dealers and to fix what ever the issue was. The boxes of the "new" improved parts often carried a sticker on the box indicating the campaign in the early years. Believe I still have a box that includes all four tie rods for a 66 that apparently was part of a campaign. Normally they were boxed individually unless they were part of a large kit - like in this example converting a car from manual steering to power

 Not sure if they had "silent" recalls back then or if all were public 
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline WT8095

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Re: NOS shock paint markings
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2015, 11:13:31 PM »
Ford in house term for what we now call a recall. The "campaign" was the process to announce, supply the parts to the dealers and to fix what ever the issue was. The boxes of the "new" improved parts often carried a sticker on the box indicating the campaign in the early years. Believe I still have a box that includes all four tie rods for a 66 that apparently was part of a campaign. Normally they were boxed individually unless they were part of a large kit - like in this example converting a car from manual steering to power

 Not sure if they had "silent" recalls back then or if all were public

Interesting, thanks!
Dave Z.

'68 fastback, S-code + C6. Special Paint (Rainbow promotion), DSO 710784. Actual build date 2/7/1968, San Jose.
'69 Cougar convertible, 351W-2V + FMX, Meadowlark Yellow.