Author Topic: phosphate and oil  (Read 1223 times)

Offline bgp429

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phosphate and oil
« on: January 08, 2017, 06:26:53 PM »
Haven't been able to find the phosphate solution. Has anyone used this Caswell product?

http://www.caswellplating.com/metal-finishing-solutions/black-oxide-kits/black-oxide-kit-1-25-gal.html

Offline carlite65

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5F09C331248

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: phosphate and oil
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2017, 06:31:13 PM »
I've used the blue fluid that is part of this kit as a cold brush on/dip to color parts. Have not used it int he tradition boil method of application

Worked for my purposes just fine. Did purchase my next (similar stuff) from one of the gun shops instead.
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline bgp429

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Re: phosphate and oil
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2017, 09:55:42 PM »
Tried to call Palmetto last week, non working number. Will try e mail.

Offline 68NordicCat

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Re: phosphate and oil
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2017, 12:51:18 AM »
I've been using this process with Etch & Prep available from Home Depot.

http://www.southsandia.com/forum/website/phosphate_etching.html

Usually dilute by about half then heat to roughly 190 degrees in a stainless steel vessel (water tray from restaurant supply house and a propane cooker for larger items; one of my wife's mixing bowls and the stove for smaller batches - she doesn't care for this method and the bowl is now a "shop item"). Blasting the parts first cleans them up and creates a nice surface for the treatment.
12/67 SJ Built 68 J code 4-spd Cougar

Offline sportyworty

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Re: phosphate and oil
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2017, 10:54:28 AM »
I use Prep and Etch as well and have for years. Dilute it with Distilled water 50/50 and get it up to 180 degrees and drop a steel wool pad in to agitate the solution. Much has been written here on the subject and peoples processes vary. I buy Manganese and Zinc to alter color on occasion for GM parts which can be purchased at a pottery supply store. Have not needed to use it though last few times for Ford parts by just increasing the time in the solution. Cheap and simple then dump the solution around my fruit trees

Offline bgp429

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Re: phosphate and oil
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2017, 11:22:03 AM »
In stock at Home Depot, on my way there. Thanks!

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: phosphate and oil
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2017, 01:06:40 PM »
. Blasting the parts first cleans them up and creates a nice surface for the treatment.


Be aware that this often changes (depending on pressure and material used to clean) the surface of the part, altering it from original

Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline bgp429

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Re: phosphate and oil
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2017, 01:48:34 PM »

Be aware that this often changes (depending on pressure and material used to clean) the surface of the part, altering it from original

The latch and hinges were spray bombed, so it's not good paint. Going to try aircraft stripper first. That should remove most of it, then fine glass beads at low 80 psi. Think that will be the least invasive method. Home Depot had the Etch and Prep. Thanks everybody.

Offline jwc66k

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Re: phosphate and oil
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2017, 03:21:46 PM »
The latch and hinges were spray bombed, so it's not good paint. Going to try aircraft stripper first. That should remove most of it, then fine glass beads at low 80 psi. Think that will be the least invasive method.
The one area you need to concentrate is the pivot points on hinges and latches. I use TIP http://www.tptools.com/ as a source for glass beads. I like their Scat Magic http://www.tptools.com/Skat-Magic-Abrasive,354.html?b=d*8019 which is made from crushed car window glass, 40-80 grit. When you think you've done a good job, go back and do the pivot points again, there's a lot of residual lubricant and crud in there. When you "cook" the parts in 180F minimum hot water and phosphate mix, some of it will loosen and may flow out. After a cold water rinse and dry cycle, hanging the part over a pan, I flush the pivot point with WD-40 until it runs clear. These are proven and tried methods. The picture of the hood hinge (it's for a 66) is too dark and was redone from scratch to a lighter shade of gray (see the center links). The springs were not redone as they should look like they were heat treated.
Read Phosphating 101 again http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/index.php?topic=4624.0 You will be the judge of the finished product, not me.
Jim
I promise to be politically correct in all my posts to keep the BBBB from vociferating.

Offline preaction

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Re: phosphate and oil
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2017, 09:00:05 PM »
If anyone is in need of a very good phosphate solution I have some bulk of E-Phos 630 which has been written about many times here and produces a very good finish for sale, please just PM me thanks Paul.
8R02S125064- January 6 1968  SJ   7F93S591808 - April 28 1967  Dearborn   7F91S544039 - December 17 1966 Dearborn