Author Topic: 68 dash clock cleaning  (Read 1999 times)

Offline ruppstang

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68 dash clock cleaning
« on: December 21, 2013, 11:18:19 PM »
I have my 68 dash clock apart and it appears that it needs to be cleaned and lubricated. I can start it and it runs for a few seconds and stops. The points contacts are ok. I would rather not convert to quartz. Any advice would be appreciated. 

Offline jwc66k

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Re: 68 dash clock cleaning
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2013, 12:05:25 AM »
I used a burnishing tool on the contacts a couple of clock that ran and then stopped after a few seconds. That worked. You couldn't see the crud but it was there so burnish away. If you have the clock out of its housing, put 12V on the coil and see if the main spring turns back and fourth as well. That's the second biggest problem and a difficult one to repair.
Jim
I promise to be politically correct in all my posts to keep the BBBB from vociferating.

Offline ruppstang

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Re: 68 dash clock cleaning
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2013, 10:18:52 AM »
What I am asking with what and how would you clean it. Then what would you use to lubricate it with?

Offline rockhouse66

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Re: 68 dash clock cleaning
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2013, 02:09:40 PM »
Scary as this sounds, I drown them in brake cleaner, then do the same with WD 40, then use very low pressure air to sort of flush out the WD.  Then clean/dry the points and give it a try.  I am maybe 2 out of 3 batting average on this working.  I figure if it isn't working to start with, I can't hurt it much.

Now, I'm sure someone will explain how WD isn't a lubricant and I understand that, but this has worked for me.  Maybe when you get it running again you could put some very light oil on the moving parts.
Jim
'66 GT FB, '69 CJ Grande

Offline jwc66k

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Re: 68 dash clock cleaning
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2013, 04:15:34 PM »
Scary as this sounds, I drown them in brake cleaner, then do the same with WD 40, then use very low pressure air to sort of flush out the WD.  Then clean/dry the points and give it a try. 
I am maybe 2 out of 3 batting average on this working. 
I would be concerned with the pressure from a brake cleaner spray, it might dislodge the mainspring. I've used triclorethane (be careful) or MEK (also be careful) either applied with an industrial cotton tipped swab from a small container (the cap or a jar maybe?). Too strong of a solvent will reduce, if not remove, the protective varnish used as an electrical insulator on the coil and as a general protective coating on the metal. The interior is protected by a can so usually not the dirty.
For a lubricant, try a drop of 3 in 1 SAE 20 Motor Oil only on pivot points, gears, etc. There are other light weight oils available. Do not use regular 3 in 1 oil as it contains paraffin. WD40 would be a distant second choice.
I've tinkered with over a dozen clocks and a defective mainspring, or its pivot points, are the worst to repair.
Jim
I promise to be politically correct in all my posts to keep the BBBB from vociferating.

Offline ruppstang

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Re: 68 dash clock cleaning
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2013, 09:30:03 PM »
Thanks guys I got it running and back in the cluster. I used some electromotive cleaner sprayed gently and it started running seconds after I started cleaning it. I had some light oil used in my air tools to lubricate it with. I have converted a number of them to quartz never realized they were that easy to fix.

Offline WT8095

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  • Dave Z.
Re: 68 dash clock cleaning
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2015, 02:20:27 PM »
I recommend electrical contact cleaner. With the red straw you can get it into the case without having to submerge or disassemble. Give a good spray, shake it around a bit and pour out the excess. Repeat 3-4 times as necessary. Contact cleaner is designed for electrical components such as switches, relays, etc. The solvent will evaporate relatively quickly, and it leaves a trace of lubrication to help the moving parts. Works great for restoring pinball machines, too!  ;)
Dave Z.

'68 fastback, S-code + C6. Special Paint (Rainbow promotion), DSO 710784. Actual build date 2/7/1968, San Jose.
'69 Cougar convertible, 351W-2V + FMX, Meadowlark Yellow.

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: 68 dash clock cleaning
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2015, 05:32:25 PM »
I recommend electrical contact cleaner. With the red straw you can get it into the case without having to submerge or disassemble. Give a good spray, shake it around a bit and pour out the excess. .........................Works great for restoring pinball machines, too!  ;)

Must take 2-4 guys to help you shake each machine then pour off the excess on those pinball machines  :o

Sorry couldn't resist
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Online 67gta289

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Re: 68 dash clock cleaning
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2015, 06:30:54 PM »
Can't do that, would get the "tilt" alarm... :o
John
67 289 GTA Dec 20 1966 San Jose
MCA 74660

Offline WT8095

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Re: 68 dash clock cleaning
« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2015, 11:55:37 PM »
Must take 2-4 guys to help you shake each machine then pour off the excess on those pinball machines  :o

Sorry couldn't resist

No kidding. Plus it takes about 30-40 cans of cleaner!
Dave Z.

'68 fastback, S-code + C6. Special Paint (Rainbow promotion), DSO 710784. Actual build date 2/7/1968, San Jose.
'69 Cougar convertible, 351W-2V + FMX, Meadowlark Yellow.