Author Topic: Aerosol cans  (Read 791 times)

Offline MustangAndFairlane1867

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Aerosol cans
« on: June 16, 2017, 01:15:47 PM »
I'm curious what forum members think about using Aerosol cans (aka, rattle cans) for touching up the semi-gloss/satin black paint in their engine compartments.  My engine is out of the car right now and it's a good chance for me to do a little sanding and some touch-up work, especially around the master cylinder where brake fluid apparently made its presence known to the paint and sheet metal around it over the years.  Is there, for example, an Eastwood product that works good and is close to the factory non-glossy black paint?  Or maybe Krylon or something similar?  Thanks, Ron



Offline jwc66k

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2017, 01:56:39 PM »
With as many variations seen, almost any semi-gloss black rattle can would work (Krylon - Home Depot). I've found Eastwood paint to be too glossy. What ever you use, keep some for touch up. Brackets for the most part were dipped and would be a glossier black but still semi-gloss. You want some variation in the sheen. The "big time" guys buy bulk because they are "big time". I have to watch my budget.
Jim
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Offline rrenz

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2017, 07:03:46 PM »
I try use Rust Oleum semi gloss black on just about everything that needs semi gloss. I want to drive it and enjoy it so Its easy to stay consistent and won't cost a arm and a leg when touch ups are needed versus a catalyzed product. If you want a little higher quality paint you could try SEM products which have a nice finish as well however rust oleum is pretty readily available. Im a professional painter and don't have a issue with rattle cans. Its all in your prep really. almost all of my engine compartment was rattle cans except parts of the engine. Just be careful with fluid leaks. especially brake fluid will act like a stripper on a enamel paint
« Last Edit: June 17, 2017, 07:07:42 PM by rrenz »
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Offline lancelot66

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2017, 02:00:17 PM »
I've done the same thing and for exactly the same reasoning. We want to get it out in nicer weather and enjoy it. NW weather is inconsistent and can be unkind sometimes, so the BoeShield gets a good workout too on Phosphate & Oil pieces each year.
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Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2017, 04:19:07 PM »
Since all your blacks should not (if we;re duplicating the original look) all have the same look or finish, if your going with rattle cans you will want to have a group of acceptable products in your arsenal

Take a panel of some kind (I typically use a gang plate used for framing with out the teeth just thew holes) and spray bands of each product in bands about 1-2" wide the length of the plate. Remember to label which product with number (since providers can change or up date products) on the face or back side.

You can also use this to compare these finishes with original ones when your dissembling and record them if you choose.  Know Charles did the same years ago (test panel for comparison)  I also did the same with about 10 different engine blues that is around here somewhere


An additional step that seems to change the glossiness of the products and helps provide a nicer IMHO finish in many cases is baking the part as they sometimes did. Seems to make the finish last longer since it has no catalyze in the product.  But this will require some testing to see what rattle can paint will take the heat and which ones can not.

Haven't done this for years but recall it was something like 250 degrees for 5-8 minutes - approx. Of course the thickness of the metal part guided towards how long it baked

For specifics I've never found a Eastwood product where I liked their blacks. But I've not tried using rattle cans for engine compartments nor large area for over a decade. When I did it had too much brown in the final look for me.

Another "trick" is to carefully heat the cans before their use to help the flow better and some products have better flowing nozzles while others will plug quickly so make sure the can gets well shook before use ;)
Jeff Speegle

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Offline midlife

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2017, 08:32:30 PM »
Another trick I found is when you're done with the rattle can, turn it upside down and press the nozzle until the aerosol is clear; this cleans the nozzle for the next time you want to use the can.

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2017, 08:48:58 PM »
Since we're adding tips - there is often a small spray? daub of paint on the inner lip that holds the can onto the can. My understanding is if you align the nozzle with the dot when you get to the bottom of the can and with the nozzle aligned and the can tipped slightly you will get the most from the can sure to a long hose that is curved towards that bottom edge that is aligned
Jeff Speegle

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Offline markb0729

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2017, 11:25:53 PM »
Another tip...

I used Krylon Semi-Flat for touch up in my engine compartment. Worked really well. Keep in mind Matching depends on what it is as originally painted with. For small knicks in the paint, I sprayed a small amount through an 8" piece of vacuum hose into an empty 1/2 oz bottle and touched up with a small model paint brush.  The paint will thicken the longer it sits in the bottle if too thin at first.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2017, 11:27:57 PM by markb0729 »
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Offline Smokey 15

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2017, 11:35:50 AM »
 I have seen/used "Satin Black", Semi-Gloss" & "Semi-Flat"from different companies.  Amount of "shine' seems to vary with the different brands.  I test, if I'm trying to match. Then I keep a record of what I used, in the folder for the car, if I have to do touch-up. Using light coats, you can make it look as good as a factory job.

Offline svo2scj

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2017, 10:51:56 AM »
We have found that Eastwood "underhood black" is one of the better sheens for look or match.   It is a "two stage" can (have to read here)  http://www.eastwood.com/ew-2k-ceramic-aerosol-underhood-black-26896.html    that ONLY LASTS 48 hours.    Have tied to use a week latter and no go !

Mark
P.S.  Just threw out a can that was only half used........next time I will use up to get the most of the $40!
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Offline dave6768

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2017, 01:44:23 PM »
Another trick I found is when you're done with the rattle can, turn it upside down and press the nozzle until the aerosol is clear; this cleans the nozzle for the next time you want to use the can.

My dad taught me that trick at a young age.   He use to keep the spray tips of each can as he finished them.  Always had spares for when they did cog.

However, many years later, I've developed a better method.   Never spray cold or cool paint.  If necessary, put the can in the sun for a while or in a pitcher filled with hot water.  Viscosity is lower and much less likely to clog.  The other big thing is shake the can very thoroughly before ever attempting the first spray and shake often during painting.  After each shake, spray a bit off to the side to make sure you have an even stream again.

I never ever clear the nozzle any more and never get clogs.  Sorry Dad.

My $0.02.

Offline jwc66k

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2017, 01:48:45 PM »
My dad taught me that trick at a young age.   He use to keep the spray tips of each can as he finished them.  Always had spares for when they did cog.

However, many years later, I've developed a better method.   Never spray cold or cool paint.  If necessary, put the can in the sun for a while or in a pitcher filled with hot water.  Viscosity is lower and much less likely to clog.  The other big thing is shake the can very thoroughly before ever attempting the first spray and shake often during painting.  After each shake, spray a bit off to the side to make sure you have an even stream again.

I never ever clear the nozzle any more and never get clogs.  Sorry Dad.

My $0.02.
Worth more than $0.02. Most of what you say is included in the instruction on the can. Nuff said.
Jim
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Offline dave6768

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Re: Aerosol cans
« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2017, 10:27:54 PM »
Worth more than $0.02. Most of what you say is included in the instruction on the can. Nuff said.
Jim

I can't read that small print on the cans.  Had to figure it out the hard way.