Author Topic: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?  (Read 585 times)

Offline MustangAndFairlane1867

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How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« on: August 25, 2017, 08:25:52 PM »
One of the original doors on my '65 Mustang has a dent about the size of a 50-cent piece on the inside, bottom of the door.  There's no way to get behind the dent for repairs, which seems to mean that a filler is the only option I have to fix it.  The problem with that, of course, is the repaired area will then be smooth and without that attractive "fabric?" pattern that is stamped in the metal all the way around the door.  I recall many years ago reading (Mustang Monthly, maybe) of a way to closely duplicate that pattern after a repair is made using a bondo-style filler, but I haven't been able to find the source anywhere.  I want to save this otherwise-nice original door, but I don't want to jump into the repair until I have a plan and maybe some suggestions on how best to do it.  I've painted the interior of these doors before, so I know about the necessity to sand gently and apply the paint lightly so as not to obliterate the "fabric" pattern.  Sure would like to hear from owners who have "been there, done that."  Many thanks. Ron

Offline petersixtfive

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2017, 08:33:06 PM »

Ron
Can you post a pic of the dent showing where it is so everyone has a better understanding
Cheers
Peter
65 SJ GT fastback July 65 Build

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2017, 10:45:43 PM »
Once you strip the door or a donor door of all the paint from the textured area you can make a mold with silicon of the texture. Once you fix the area (since its pretty small) and apply filler you can apply the mold. remove it then join the "lines" pattern carefully with a toothpick then once dry knock down any material that was pushed up through the process. Practice a number of times first before the final. Also clean, clean and clean again the surface if you used your project door to make sure any silicon is gone our you'll curse yourself later.

Just one way some have made it work
Jeff Speegle

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Offline 67gtasanjose

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2017, 10:13:28 AM »
Once you strip the door or a donor door of all the paint from the textured area you can make a mold with silicon of the texture. Once you fix the area (since its pretty small) and apply filler you can apply the mold. remove it then join the "lines" pattern carefully with a toothpick then once dry knock down any material that was pushed up through the process. Practice a number of times first before the final. Also clean, clean and clean again the surface if you used your project door to make sure any silicon is gone our you'll curse yourself later.

Just one way some have made it work

There are so many better products to use as a molding compound, I doubt I (personally) would use ANYTHING silicone. (Silicone is the 'Enemy' of any painter).
Several years ago, I purchased a "Plastex" branded, plastic repair kit with something called a "molding bar" included to form the shapes of missing parts and/or textured surfaces. ANYTHING along those lines (IMHO) should be a MUCH BETTER choice than ANYTHING silicone. Again, my opinion. I have not tried to duplicate this texture on steel surfaces, so if other's recommendations work...I certainly do not wish to discredit their advice. ...but YES, if silicone is used...CLEAN, CLEAN, CLEAN afterwards!
Richard Urch

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2005 (04/05) GT Premium Convertible, Windveil Blue, Parchment Top w/Med. Parchment interior,  Roush Body Appointments

Offline SamG

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2017, 01:33:53 AM »
I think I've posted before on this...but I've used 3M rocker spray (The green label I think...it dries harder and faster) to spray a texture coat on the repaired area then knocked the top off with some fine sandpaper. 

Try it on an area first though.  It worked for me.  Far from perfect but worked well after repairing some speaker holes. 

I will need to do it again, as I have a perfect rust free right door shell with a nice dent in the interior door my granddaughter put in there for me.  Ugh. 

If I can find a can out in the shop I'll try to duplicate it and snap a few pics. 

SamG

Yes I know it's an old post but I've not been around in a while.

Offline mtinkham

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2018, 01:59:42 PM »
Sam, looking forward to seeing your repair. I just finished a 67 Coupe that took me weeks to fit the repo doors.  I would prefer to fix my originals.

Mark
1967 S-code Fastback, GT, 3-speed manual, Metuchen, Scheduled 04-21-1967 - Actual 04-25-1967

Offline Bossbill

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2018, 02:55:17 PM »
I just repaired a section of my 67 SJ car door that required grain.

First, I agree that silicone is the enemy of paint. My painter will not allow me to bring in any part that has any silicone on it -- ever.

My wife loves making molds, mostly of garden art forms. She has done this for over a decade and uses liquid latex almost exclusively for the master mold. Mother molds are another topic and not needed here.

I brought over a 3' long heat source (infrared or strip) and brought the area to 70-80*.
Liquid latex is simply brushed on an area of the door that you wish to use as the grain template. I use an area of about 4"x8". I first go horizontally and let the area dry and become darker. Then vertically and then diagonally. I go up to about 5 or 6 coats.
I let the area sit for a few hours and then add baby powder to the side facing.
The template is then flipped over and baby powder applied there.
The result is a mold that is extremely flexible.
If you want a mold with more rigidity add a layer or two of cheesecloth as the final two steps. For my door fix the extra rigidity was a detriment, so I used only latex.

I first got the area very close to the original form with metal. In my case rust had eaten through parts of the corner. The area in question then had a 2K primer applied and allowed to dry for days. I brought the area up to a decent temperature (mid 70s) with the heat source and applied a very thin and even layer of filler. I made sure the filler did not go much beyond the blank area by using blue tape. The mold material was then wrapped around this area and tapped in position to keep it static.
Use a paint stick, bondo spreader or other forms to press the mold into the bondo. My area was curved and present a much different set of issues than a flat area -- which should be much simpler.

After the bondo has kicked you can remove the mold material and use dental picks or other tools to meld in areas not quite perfect.
Wash the mold with thinner to remove any remaining material and repeat the dusting of baby powder -- spread it around with your hand.

This requires a lot of patience and you will not get it right the first time. This is tedious, so be ready for that.

I'll post a pic of the finished product, but due to my door's complex shape I've done each surface as a separate run and have one or two (out of six) areas left (before I had back issues, again).

Here is a shot of how one curve was done.
[edit stupid grammatical errors]


« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 02:57:38 PM by Bossbill »
Bill
Concours 3/2/67 GT350
Driven     6/6/70 0T02G160xxx B302
Modified  5/18/65 5F09A728xxx 2+2
Race       65 Coupe front clip, Convertible frame mods and SFCs; 2+2 conversion; Many 'glass parts

Offline Bossbill

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2018, 03:00:55 PM »
I think I've posted before on this...but I've used 3M rocker spray (The green label I think...it dries harder and faster) to spray a texture coat on the repaired area then knocked the top off with some fine sandpaper. 

My painter was doing some paint match on a spare door I brought him and did this same thing.
On edit, here is a pic of this texture, unsanded.
Decent fix for a daily driver.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 03:27:09 PM by Bossbill »
Bill
Concours 3/2/67 GT350
Driven     6/6/70 0T02G160xxx B302
Modified  5/18/65 5F09A728xxx 2+2
Race       65 Coupe front clip, Convertible frame mods and SFCs; 2+2 conversion; Many 'glass parts

Offline mtinkham

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2018, 01:27:33 PM »
Looking forward to seeing the result of the latex mold....I think I would like to try that.
1967 S-code Fastback, GT, 3-speed manual, Metuchen, Scheduled 04-21-1967 - Actual 04-25-1967

Offline Bossbill

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2018, 03:02:31 PM »
It's hard to make out the grain unless you paint it and I'm not ready for that on the door.

Here is one of my first tests to see how the grain looked. This is your standard body filler -- a Wesco in-house brand. I made little effort to blend the filler into the surrounding area. The test piece was painted with just a light fogging of semi-gloss black so I could actually see the grain.



Bill
Concours 3/2/67 GT350
Driven     6/6/70 0T02G160xxx B302
Modified  5/18/65 5F09A728xxx 2+2
Race       65 Coupe front clip, Convertible frame mods and SFCs; 2+2 conversion; Many 'glass parts

Offline caspian65

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Re: How to repair inside of door on vintage Mustangs?
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2018, 04:36:43 PM »
That looks nice.  The main challenge will be blending with the surrounding area.  It would be best to leave as much of the original door grain as possible intact.  Use hard tape, like aluminum backed on the surface of the door and fill from the backside.  This works well for small pin holes after any rust has been removed/neutralized.
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