Author Topic: Driveline Restoration - my attempt  (Read 13575 times)

Offline J_Speegle

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Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« on: July 18, 2009, 12:58:46 AM »
PROJECT: Driveline Restoration

Click the link below for pdf version of this article
Driveline Restoration Article.pdf

TIME: Approx 4 hrs depending on condition of the driveline

SUPPLIES:

- Assorted rags
- 000 Steel wool
- Assorted sandpaper 150-600/800
- 4 oz bottle of liquid gun bluing repair fluid
- Automotive striping tape approx 40 ft
- Spray can of satin clear, protective oil or protective wax
- Optional (based on class) spray can of cast colored paint for end yokes
- Assorted bottles/spray cans of modeling enamel for paint mark reproduction [/color]



+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Recently I was faced with the task of restoring a driveline for a car I was doing.
The way I had it figured,

1.  I could buy a new driveline with all the details done (cost a bit and no real challenge)

2. Could have the tube replaced with a bright shinny new one (cost is less but I lose the original weights)

3. Restore the one I have.  It’s not badly pitted plus I could try out a idea or two concerning reproducing the finishes


Pretty easy to figure out what I choose.






1- First I lightly blasted the driveline to remove any rust, corrosion, paint and whatever had built up over the years.
Be careful not to add any more texture to the surface than you have to. The more you add the more you will have to sand out later.



2- Next I sanded the tube lengthwise working my way (as the slight pits and scratches disappeared) up to 500 grit sandpaper.




3- Next the fun part. Since this is going to be a Concours restoration I could use a little paint to get me where I needed to be. In that case I would paint just the end yokes with a cast iron paint that I found matches the original look well. When applying I would make sure that I did not color over any of the welding beads that formed the mating edge between the tube and yokes. 

Instead, for this project,  I choose to do it as I would a Thoroughbred car and choose gun bluing solution discussed elsewhere to bring the freshly blasted yokes back to where they need to be as far as tone and tint.

I like to wire brush my parts before I add the gun bluing since I find that it produces a better final look in the metal.






4- Using the gun bluing solution and a brush I spread the liquid over the welds found on each end of the tube.

Next, with a rag, I applied a band (soft outer edge on the tube side) of bluing on the tube. This would reproduce the heat bluing that would have been produced when the two items were welded together.

While I was at it, I added a little “heat” to the driveline weights. Though dark now they will tone down as we work the surface.




5- With 600-800 grit paper I sanded down the edge of the bluing and in, slightly, to produce a smooth transaction between the bare metal of the tube to the look of the darker gun bluing near the weld. All this all takes in approx ½”
NOTE: Don’t forget to brighten up the machined surfaces on each yoke. Really makes a difference in the final look.






6- Next I found the original seam in the driveline tube. This is where the flat piece of metal was formed into a tube and welded the complete length. Like the ends of the tube this seam would also show a heat line originally. It would have been darker at the center, fading out to nothing at the edges.

To reproduce this I first laid out two lengths of stripping tape approx 3/8” wide and then, with a rag, applied a uniform coat of gun bluing, working it into the rag and tube as a rubbed. I did this twice to insure a dark line.






7- Next I remove the tape and then reapplied two more strips of tape approx  ¼-3/8” from the edge (on each side) of the first stripe.  To this I applied a light coat of gun bluing using a rag one more time, working it into the metal and the rag leaving no liquid on the metal.






8- Finally I removed the last of the tape and lightly sanded the heat stripe and the edges so that all noticeable signs of the tape (sharp edges) were erased and the overall look was muted. Once you get a good consistency (one end to the other) stop!





This driveline happened to be of the tube-in-a-tube design so I could not forget the heat seam on the inner tube.







9- At this point you can apply the original paint marks to the tube and yokes, if you found any. If not simply leave them for later..
Follow that with a light coat of satin clear or a spray wax or oil to finish.
Now stand back and take pleasure in a job well done.



« Last Edit: July 24, 2009, 10:51:24 PM by J_Speegle »
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline Sluggo

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2009, 01:14:50 AM »
Brilliant!

Excellent method and concise presentation.

Thanks Jeff.
MCA 55330 | 69 Mach1 | 427 Stroker | 29 Model A Murray Town Car | 4 Banger

Offline Cruise

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2009, 09:27:24 AM »
Jeff - Can you post a picture of the driveshaft before you started?  Also, what method did you use to remove the surface rust?
1970 Mustang Convertible, October 1969 build date.  Still very early in restoration.
1970 Mustang Mach I, April 1970 build date.  Can see the light at the end of the tunnel.
MCA Certified Judge - 69-71 Boss and 69-70 Mustang classes

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2009, 12:11:09 AM »
Jeff - Can you post a picture of the driveshaft before you started?  Also, what method did you use to remove the surface rust?

Not great pictures - sorry. The close up gives a better illustration of the finish I started with.

As mentioned in the article I lightly blasted it in a cabinet - just enough to remove the surface rust and crud - without adding anymore texture, from the blasting than I needed to.

Would just mean more sanding :(



Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline Cruise

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2009, 12:54:00 AM »
Thanks for the pic, Jeff.  I feel a lot better about using my original driveshaft now.  It looks pretty much like what you started with.
1970 Mustang Convertible, October 1969 build date.  Still very early in restoration.
1970 Mustang Mach I, April 1970 build date.  Can see the light at the end of the tunnel.
MCA Certified Judge - 69-71 Boss and 69-70 Mustang classes

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2009, 01:03:45 AM »
Good luck and let us know how the methods work for you.
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline ~GT-350#3000~

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2009, 09:51:20 PM »
Hi Jeff:

Nice Job. Is that  67 OR 68 DRIVESHAFT? Thanks!

JIM
#3000

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2009, 10:37:22 PM »
Hi Jeff:

Nice Job. Is that  67 OR 68 DRIVESHAFT?

It's a 69  and one of the two piece styles
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline ~GT-350#3000~

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2009, 11:36:32 AM »
Hi Jeff:

Nice Job. Is that  67 OR 68 DRIVESHAFT?

It's a 69  and one of the two piece styles

Ok Thanks. My uncles unrestored 68 Mustang has the same two piece design. I think im going to crawl under his car and see if there are any stripes left on the driveshaft.

You have been a huge help with the restoration of #3000. Im currently investigating the stripes that would have come on my 67 driveshaft. The driveshaft was badly rusted. No stripes could be found. Identifying 67 driveshaft stripes from what I hear hasn't really been established by restorers. So if you are familiar with color stripes for a 67 Shelby with a 289 4 speed built on 6/7/67 in San Jose I would love to hear your input.

Thanks in advance!
Jim
#3000

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2009, 12:18:23 PM »
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Identifying 67 driveshaft stripes from what I hear hasn't really been established by restorers. So if you are familiar with color stripes for a 67 Shelby with a 289 4 speed built on 6/7/67 in San Jose I would love to hear your input.



Jim - so we don't get off thread - PM sent ;)
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline ~GT-350#3000~

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2009, 02:45:29 PM »
Thank you Jeff!

Jim
#3000

Offline 8T03S1425

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2009, 09:17:26 PM »
I'm glad I found this forum and I hope to learn much from it. If this first experience is an indication of what's to be learned, I'm in a good place.   :)

Excellant article on driveshaft restoration!!!

I'm working on a '68 GT500. As I do things to get the car back on the road, I'd like my efforts to be directed to making things correct. I've found that it sometimes it doesn't take that much more effort to do things correctly than it does to just get by.

Any-who, my driveshart was covered with undercoating of some sort. I spent hours hand handing with poor results. Unfortunately, I don't have access to a sandblaster, nor am I sure that sandblasting would be the best way to remove that stuff. I couldn't find any chemicals or solvents that would cut it and I was reluctant to use heat. Instead, I used one of the semi hard Scothbrite type of abrasive wheels in my electric drill to get the bulk of the undercoating off. I did this perpendicular to the shaft with a light touch.

Now, I'm hand sanding the length of the tube to get the scratches off. I started with 60 grit and now working with 150 grit. So far I'm satisfied with the results, but I'm getting a high luster finish. If I work up to 600 - 800 grit, it may end up looking like a mirror. Is that the look I want, or does it need to be a less shiney look?

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2009, 12:17:46 AM »
.............Now, I'm hand sanding the length of the tube to get the scratches off. I started with 60 grit and now working with 150 grit. So far I'm satisfied with the results, but I'm getting a high luster finish. If I work up to 600 - 800 grit, it may end up looking like a mirror. Is that the look I want, or does it need to be a less shiney look?

Welcome - glad you found us

Need to get it down to a point where the sanding marks can't be seen and if its shiney that will not last long. Brand new pipe is pretty nice though it may have a few scraps in the surface (easy enough to move the finished driveline over the edge of the work bench or the like a few times) from moving it around but nothing that would gouge the metal
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline rmaginnis

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2010, 12:51:42 AM »
Jeff,
I am using this article to detail my drive shaft. So far so good. I used lots of water to rinse the bluing off so tomorrow I'll know if things turn brown or not. 
Question, in your last pic it appears you painted the yoke orange (red oxide maybe?) Both yokes on mine were painted mostly orange although tough to tell if it was 100% (dipped, paint brush) with all the rust. What have you found? Were they orange before they were welded onto the tube or painted afterwards?
Thanks,
Rick
Rick Maginnis
April, '70 Dearborn Boss 302
0F02G18xxxx

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2010, 02:40:17 AM »
Jeff,
I am using this article to detail my drive shaft. So far so good. I used lots of water to rinse the bluing off so tomorrow I'll know if things turn brown or not. 

Hope everything turns out well. I just wiped mine with a wet rag, sanded and finished it all in a few hours. Guess I left it no opportunity to brown or flash rust   ;)


Question, in your last pic it appears you painted the yoke orange (red oxide maybe?) Both yokes on mine were painted mostly orange although tough to tell if it was 100% (dipped, paint brush) with all the rust. What have you found? Were they orange before they were welded onto the tube or painted afterwards?

Jack Brooks has looked into this and were my understanding comes from - he found that the inside surface of the ends were painted inside. This would indicate that the ends were painted before they were attached - likely to help the worker identify all the different ones that were likely at his work station.

Let us know how things work for you

Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)