Author Topic: Driveline Restoration - my attempt  (Read 16295 times)

Offline fastback66

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2010, 04:49:41 PM »
were the ends of the driveshafts phospate coated? also was the slip yoke phosphated? I was thinking of having a new tube put in mine its about 150.00 but wasnt sure how to do the ends. Thanks

Offline rmaginnis

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    • December 2010
Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2010, 08:32:27 PM »
I can't speak to other years but my 69/70 DS saddles were painted orange. I don't think it would have been beneficial to phosphate coat the saddles since they were welded to the tube. Phosphate creates an oxide layer which is undesireable for welding. I would assume they were left 'as cast' or raw forged state.
Rick
Rick Maginnis
April, '70 Dearborn Boss 302
0F02G18xxxx

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #32 on: September 17, 2010, 10:10:09 PM »
were the ends of the driveshafts phospate coated? also was the slip yoke phosphated? I was thinking of having a new tube put in mine its about 150.00 but wasnt sure how to do the ends. Thanks

No the cast ends were not phosphated  - just cast


I can't speak to other years but my 69/70 DS saddles were painted orange. ............

Sorry Rick not all of them - depended on the size of the yoke (marker was used by the guys making the drivelines to identify one specific size of yoke)
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline fastback66

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #33 on: September 17, 2010, 11:18:43 PM »
Thanks! For the info... What about the slip yoke it doesnt look like it was phosphated either but just want to make sure on my 66!

Offline fastback66

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #34 on: September 17, 2010, 11:33:42 PM »
Also what would you think about have a clear powder coated over the finished results for a driver car? I am doing mine the same way you showed me and it is looking great! I know you can get a low gloss clear finish from the powder coating.

Offline 68 S Code

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #35 on: September 21, 2010, 10:18:18 AM »
Another option to sanding it might be just lightly brushing it with the 3M stripping wheel found at the hardware store. I would stay away from a wire wheel. Then get a 5 gallon container of Evapo-rust and a long trough. Fill the container with the solution and let the drive shaft sit for a day or two. Might be amazed at how well this product works. I did my 40 year old emergency brake cables and they looked like the day they were originally fabricated. Couldn't believe how well it worked. Fasteners are now a breeze. I believe you may not even have to do the bluing as the solution only attacks rust. Doesn't pit the metal from what i noticed.  The heat marks should be visible. I am a big fan of this stuff but a word of warning...be careful with anything galvanized. I dipped the gas tank filler neck in there over the weekend and there was a chemical reaction which left a bright green streaking at the darker galvanizing. It was a pain to get it off. Finally took a soft brass brush to it. Not happy as the galvanizing patina turned a little bit shinier then I wanted. Can't wait to drop in the original upper and lower control arms. Just a bit worried about the lower arm ball joints and what the solution might do to the internal joint. Rubber doesn't seem to be effected as the cables had small rubber pieces which seem to not have been effected. Wish I had a drive shaft to try out.

Offline e093116

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #36 on: September 22, 2010, 06:02:51 PM »
Jeff, thanks for the write up.

I refinished my driveshaft over the weekend with similar results to what you and others posted.

I found that using green, brown, and natural scotch brite hand pads worked well for blending out the bluing in lieu of fine sandpaper.

I also mixed up some satin clear by combining PPG DCU 2060 and DCU 2021.  This was the first time I used bluing and flattened clear so besides having a restored driveshaft the experience with new materials was also worthwhile.
65 San Jose Fastback, May 15 build date

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #37 on: September 25, 2010, 02:45:00 AM »
Jeff, thanks for the write up.

I refinished my driveshaft over the weekend with similar results to what you and others posted.

I found that using green, brown, and natural scotch brite hand pads worked well for blending out the bluing in lieu of fine sandpaper.

I also mixed up some satin clear by combining PPG DCU 2060 and DCU 2021.  This was the first time I used bluing and flattened clear so besides having a restored driveshaft the experience with new materials was also worthwhile.

Glad to hear it worked well for another restorer
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline 68NordicCat

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #38 on: September 07, 2015, 11:29:56 AM »
Jeff - GREAT article. Used it to refinish my single piece 68 J Code 4spd Cougar DS (Dec 67 SJ built). Started with an Evaporust bath - made a narrow trough out of $9 piece of foam insulation from HD lined with contractor grade garbage bag - cut the sides off and unfolded at bottom seem to create a long sheet (the tighter the fit in the trough the fewer jugs of Evaporust) - which took off all the old crud and really revealed the paint markings. A word of caution - although the markings were very clear and the DS was basically back to a nice dull gray finish the markings paint came off completely when I rinsed it. So I was glad I documented what I found after the bath before the rinse.

Followed your article from there. I had some pretty good pitting so to speed the sanding process I clipped a 1-1/2" thick piece of packing foam to a palm sander. Starting with 80 grit and then increasingly fine grits I ran the sander in a lengthwise motion. The foam allowed the paper to wrap the shaft following the contour but gave it a little more aggressive action. Finished by hand with the finest paper to eliminate the fine cross grain pattern left by the tool.

Got some "browning" of the bluing (since bluing is essentially an oxidation process I gather), but when I wiped those areas down before applying the clear satin, the top coat really brought back the dark finish. Also read in a gun maintenance forum that heating the part before the bluing can help reduce the rusting effect. Tried it using a heat gun with my second application on the long weld and seemed to work a bit better but couldn't swear to it.

Some before and after pics below. Probably got the markings too neat - hard sometimes to force yourself to be quick and somewhat sloppy like factory conditions. But happy with the results. Thanks.

The info here is invaluable as I continue bringing my Cougar back to life.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2015, 11:43:31 AM by 68NordicCat »
12/67 SJ Built 68 J code 4-spd Cougar

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #39 on: September 08, 2015, 07:20:26 PM »
Thanks - that is what we're here for but always happy to know success can be repeated by the members here
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline lathamjr

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #40 on: February 18, 2017, 12:23:29 AM »
Jeff - I just want to ask about the timing of the bluing steps. On the weld line how long did you wait before applying the additional strips on the side? And then how long till you sanded for the blend? Do you apply another layer of bluing over the center stripe as you do the sides? I'm probably overthinking it but questions can be easier than re-dos.
Thanks

Offline J_Speegle

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #41 on: February 18, 2017, 01:04:35 AM »
Jeff - I just want to ask about the timing of the bluing steps. On the weld line how long did you wait before applying the additional strips on the side?

By the time you get to the other end you can wipe (in the direction of the stripe) with a paper towel to make sure its dry and pull the stripe tape


And then how long till you sanded for the blend?

Your using allot less liquid and not letting it "sit" so you get a light discoloration. Once you get it applied it should be ready to peal back the tape and feather the edges. The product recats (when applied with a rag or brush almost instantly and leaving it longer than a couple of seconds does not make it any darker.

Do you apply another layer of bluing over the center stripe as you do the sides?

Yes it is easier to just redo the tape spaced further out on both sides and cover all three (dark stripe, and both sides) at the same time and it eliminates the possibility of leaving a untreated gap at the edge of the dark stripe



I'm probably overthinking it but questions can be easier than re-dos.

Don't we all ;)  Great things is this is likely the easiest redo that I know of

If you have a piece of oil free bare steel (like a small sheet or bar) practice there first if you want to get the hang of it

Good luck
Jeff Speegle

Anything worth doing is worth doing concours ;)

Offline Crgjohnson

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Re: Driveline Restoration - my attempt
« Reply #42 on: February 18, 2017, 11:10:00 AM »
Very good info. I soaked my driveline in evapo rust for a couple days with good results. I think your methods work better. Thank you for sharing