Author Topic: 67-70 Manual Steering Idler Arm Mounting Arm -Re: Original Take Off Idler Arms  (Read 10266 times)

Offline J_Speegle

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The discussion of this nut brings up the question of it being dyed red to indicate a critical torque spec. or left alone.  Most if not all of the front suspension/steering fasteners are marked with red dye - should this one be included in the list of "critical torque" fasteners?

Don't believe so John - at least I've never haven't seen them dyed or on any list that shows that they were marked that way. The number/volume of those items really increased during 68 production - then increased a little more during 69
Jeff Speegle

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Offline 67gtasanjose

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The discussion of this nut brings up the question of it being dyed red to indicate a critical torque spec. or left alone.  Most if not all of the front suspension/steering fasteners are marked with red dye - should this one be included in the list of "critical torque" fasteners?

Don't believe so John - at least I've never haven't seen them dyed or on any list that shows that they were marked that way. The number/volume of those items really increased during 68 production - then increased a little more during 69

+1 on what Jeff mentioned. (going by every NOS, restored, used and otherwise idler arm in my research)

This item (the nut) was part of the Idler Arm as an assembly. The nut is not in any assembly manual I have seen. Since I do not have a MPC for anything, I cannot verify it isn't in one, but I sincerely doubt it is in any MPC  (my unconfirmed suspicions has the idler arm supplier as TRW).
Richard Urch

1967 (11/2/66, S.J.) Luxury Coupe, 289-4V w/Thermactor Emissions, C-4, Well Optioned
2005 (04/05) GT Premium Convertible, Windveil Blue, Parchment Top w/Med. Parchment interior,  Roush Body Appointments

Offline azscj

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I wanted to back up a few comments on the replacement locking nut.  I rarely see this style used and had to search thru a dozen idler arms I have until I finally found one that uses it.  Has anyone found a source for the more common locking nut I have pictured here below?  I never spent any time looking for this yet but at some point will need to...

Marcus Anghel
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Offline jwc66k

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I wanted to back up a few comments on the replacement locking nut.  I rarely see this style used and had to search thru a dozen idler arms I have until I finally found one that uses it.  Has anyone found a source for the more common locking nut I have pictured here below?  I never spent any time looking for this yet but at some point will need to...


A picture is worth a thousand words, but the size required is priceless.
Jim
I promise to be politically correct in all my posts to keep the BBBB from vociferating.

Offline 67gtasanjose

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A picture is worth a thousand words, but the size required is priceless.
Jim

It should be a 9/16" 18 (fine thread) lock nut if the shafts are the same.

I do not see it at AMK
Richard Urch

1967 (11/2/66, S.J.) Luxury Coupe, 289-4V w/Thermactor Emissions, C-4, Well Optioned
2005 (04/05) GT Premium Convertible, Windveil Blue, Parchment Top w/Med. Parchment interior,  Roush Body Appointments

Offline azscj

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Yes....its exactly the same thread just the locking nut is different.  I never seen in as available in the AMK catalog. 
Marcus Anghel
MCA National Gold Card Judge, 69-71 Mustang
SAAC National Head Judge, Boss Mustangs

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Offline jwc66k

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I found two nuts that "may" fit the bill. In the picture, the upper nut is "similar" to the nuts on 64-66 Strut rods, 34426-S7. The second nut, shown unattached, is "similar" to the nuts used on C4 transmissions - "manual control valve" - 377330-S Ref Sec A70.4 P13. Both are grade 5. The thickness is the next question, 34426-S8 is 0.473/0.496 in thk, 377330-S is 0.349 in thk. Check the thickness of your samples. Those are the only two 9/16-18 I've documented with those two locking styles, there may be others.
Jim
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Offline 67350#1242

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Thought I would add some information I've discovered recently while playing with these idler arms:
There are 2 different Ford engineering numbers cast into the arms being discussed;

C7ZA-3355-B = Mustang arm, both manual and power arms - each with different size bores on the center link bushing end.
C7OA-3355-B = Fairlane/Torino/Falcon arm both manual and power - same bore difference but about 1/4" shorter than the Mustang arm.

Service replacement arms without cast eng. numbers:

C7ZA arms have a faint 283 number on the arm - all else dimensionally the same as the factory arm.
C7OA arms have a faint 183 number on the arm - looks same as the 283 but again is about 1/4" shorter.

This info is from carefully examining NOS replacement arms of both types, and comparing to factory pieces.

At first glance, the 183 and 283 can appear to be  188 and 288 but the last number is a 3.

I believe that TRW was one manufacturer for service parts - if you can find a vintage TRW part # 18686 with the nut and crimped threads it will be virtually identical to the C7ZZ-3350-A service replacement power steering arm (without eng # but with 283#).  TRW 18687 is for manual steering.

Vintage Perfect Circle part # 268-3497 and 268-3498 for power and manual arms also  have the 283  on the arm itself, as if from same source.
Some, if not all of the Perfect Circle arms had a 3 hole bracket, even for power steering - which is confusing.  Even though it had 3 holes, the other dimensions (length, etc) same as 2 hole bracket.
I think there is a Perfect circle 268-3498 manual arm now on EBay. for reference.

Well, that's about all I have - again, this is just my personal experience and thought I would add it to the thread.
Kurt.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2017, 11:33:47 AM by 67350#1242 »

Offline 67gtasanjose

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Thought I would add some information I've discovered recently while playing with these idler arms:
There are 2 different Ford engineering numbers cast into the arms being discussed;

C7ZA-3355-B = Mustang arm, both manual and power arms - each with different size bores on the center link bushing end.
C7OA-3355-B = Fairlane/Torino/Falcon arm both manual and power - same bore difference but about 1/4" shorter than the Mustang arm.

Service replacement arms without cast eng. numbers:

C7ZA arms have a faint 283 number on the arm - all else dimensionally the same as the factory arm.
C7OA arms have a faint 183 number on the arm - looks same as the 283 but again is about 1/4" shorter.
R
This info is from carefully examining NOS replacement arms of both types, and comparing to factory pieces.

At first glance, the 183 and 283 can appear to be  188 and 288 but the last number is a 3.

I believe that TRW was one manufacturer for service parts - if you can find a vintage TRW part # 18686 with the nut and crimped threads it will be virtually identical to the C7ZZ-3350-A service replacement power steering arm (without eng # but with 283#).  TRW 18687 is for manual steering.

Vintage Perfect Circle part # 268-3497 and 268-3498 for power and manual arms also  have the 283 on the arm itself, as if from same source.
Some, if not all of the Perfect Circle arms had a 3 hole bracket, even for power steering - which is confusing.  Even though it had 3 holes, the other dimensions (length, etc) same as 2 hole bracket.
I think there is a Perfect circle 268-3498 manual arm now on EBay. for reference.

Well, that's about all I have - again, this is just my personal experience and thought I would add it to the thread.
Kurt.

I have in my hands today a NOS service replacement C7OZ-3350-B (Ford paper tag in place) and can nearly confirm it as this poster claims in the previous comment: "C7OA arms have a faint 183 number on the arm - looks same as the 283 but again is about 1/4" shorter.", but I can only confirm it as about 1/4" shorter than the factory type with dual bushings I have on hand at this time.
I say "factory type" only because the only example I have on hand to compare the length with does not have Ford engineering numbers or a FoMoCo logo as others have found on certain examples.

FWIW, this C7OZ service example does have the faint "183" that looks much like it is "188" as this previous poster has stated. Another note is that this "Fairlane" version (C7OZ), the one bushing is pressed FULLY SEATED, where as the "Mustang" version (C7ZZ) would be centered, not fully pressed in and seated against the bushing flange (I hope this makes sense to those reading) I have read elsewhere that certain FORD big cars can be adapted for use to Mustangs if the correct bushings are pressed in the same manner as the Mustangs were.  The correct manner is (as pictured earlier in this thread) with the center link bushing fully seated agains the bushing flange and the mounting arm bracket bushing approximately centered into the bushing's sleeve (not seated against the flange)

« Last Edit: January 20, 2017, 08:10:55 AM by 67gtasanjose »
Richard Urch

1967 (11/2/66, S.J.) Luxury Coupe, 289-4V w/Thermactor Emissions, C-4, Well Optioned
2005 (04/05) GT Premium Convertible, Windveil Blue, Parchment Top w/Med. Parchment interior,  Roush Body Appointments