ConcoursMustang Forums

Restoring - General discussions that apply across many different years and models => Body, Paint & Sealers => Topic started by: Bossbill on December 29, 2017, 02:23:41 PM

Title: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on December 29, 2017, 02:23:41 PM
Somewhere I saw an article on how to replicate undercarriage floor paint drips using a hypodermic with a small sponge around the tip, sans needle, of course.
Maybe it was here -- maybe somewhere else.

I can't find it -- any help appreciated.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: J_Speegle on December 29, 2017, 03:38:22 PM
I recall at least one discussing the "faking" of the runs and drips on the undercarriage and the few pictures that accompanied the thread. Like you it may have been on another site but the search over there didn't turn anything up. If we discover it later we can always merge the two but its important enough to go over it again since there is a need.

Think Brent's posts of Jeremy's restoration of one of those cars may be the thread (linked) that we both may have been thinking of from a couple of years ago


I've not had to do it before (just went the "lots of paint route") but recall guys using rattle cans to focus on the low points, building the paint until it pooled and gathered then finally forming multiple drips as planned.  There are allot of these points so its going to take some time. A bunch of drips in one area while none in others is only going to look odd, inconsistent and unoriginal IMHO Also the body is going to need to be level and upside down.

The thin rattle cans will provide a very narrow pattern and you may need to come back and feather the edges away from the ribs once everything is dry so that the process is not obvious


Sure some others will have some additional experiences and thoughts to share
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: jwc66k on December 29, 2017, 04:54:13 PM
A bunch of drips in one area while none in others is only going to look odd, inconsistent and unoriginal IMHO Also the body is going to need to be level and upside down.
Drips were not a desired characteristic. They occurred on the raised (downward) parts of the floor pan and mostly to the rear (caused by gravity and forced air drying?). There were a lot visible on the right side and very few on the left at the rear of the pan just before the upturn for the rear axle. They were all very solid, as in many years of drying. This was on a San Jose March 66 build.
Jim
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on December 29, 2017, 07:08:41 PM
I should add that the 67-68 MCA judging guide states on 5A "primer paint drips should be visible . . . "
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: J_Speegle on December 29, 2017, 08:04:52 PM
I should add that the 67-68 MCA judging guide states on 5A "primer paint drips should be visible . . . "

Don't think that is important for the discussion ;)   It's IMHO more about what was original and how to replicate it.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: 1969 Cale II on December 29, 2017, 08:30:59 PM
Would it be hard to color match the "drip paint" to the underneath color? Like Jeff said, I and have done, wouldn't be easier to just repaint with a higher volume to make things equal? If you are going this far, the drips should have body color over spray on the outside of the drips. I did manage to get this on my car. But that be really anal. If your going to do it, try hard to do it right.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on December 29, 2017, 11:26:50 PM
Muscle Car Restorations in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin was restoring a B9 (http://www.hotrod.com/articles/boss-of-the-barn-restoring-a-barn-find-boss-429-part-2-undercarriage-restoration/).

The primer/sealer floor drips looked just like the 67s. They explained that the drips weren't so much drips as "drips that exploded after going through the baking process."

That actually made a lot of sense since a lot of the drips I've seen actually look like craters, rather than drips. What I've been trying to replicate is this moon crater look.

This is the first I've heard of baking the red oxide, but it makes a lot of sense since it's impossible to assemble a car with a wet primer underbody.

Was the floorpan baked at the factory?
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: J_Speegle on December 30, 2017, 02:05:42 AM
For 67 San Jose I'm not convinced that they are popped bubbles or collapsed drips or bubbles. Also not sure how air or fumes could have been produced inside a drip while not producing the same results in runs right next to these things. The reaction of the drips might be a result of exposure to heating lamps where the outer surface dried first then still not completely dry collapsed upward or the body was rolled causing this. IMHO knowing why isn't as important to us as how to reproduce the look on our restored cars though we do continue to try and find out how the process was done when possible.

Looking at San Jose examples I would report that maybe 40% of the drips produced these divots and in those cases 80-90% collapsed rather than what appears to be bursts shown on the 69 Dearborn example you have in the link. When they collapsed they didn't leave bare metal showing but sealed back up leaving often an odd multi-legged (for lack of a better term) pattern in the collapsed drip.



A few 67 San Jose examples - It should be noted that not all cars had as many drips or at the same location the pictures are provided only for discussion of the subject at hand

Passenger side front frame rail and outer floor pan

(http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/gallery/9/6-301217010044.jpeg)


Typical drips collecting along the low points of the floor pan. In this example the ribs just behind a front seat

(http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/gallery/9/6-301217005955.jpeg)


The rear floor under the rear seat riser. In this case the ribs are formed upward so the paint collected on the main floor surface here as well as runs on the seat riser panel since it is not perfectly flat

(http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/gallery/9/6-301217010024.jpeg)


To the far right in the following picture you can see the runs that collected as the rear (under rear seat) flowed into the main floor section

(http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/gallery/9/6-301217010012.jpeg)

Hope this helps.

And I haven't forgotten about your fastback trap door questions ;)
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on December 30, 2017, 09:14:42 AM
It's always a losing game trying to explain one year's/one plant's methods to another's, isn't it?

I think it's solvent pop. The gif below explains.

Thanks again for the pics. I hope it helps others as well.
Back into the shop to experiment on spare sheet metal.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Chris Thauberger on December 30, 2017, 11:04:32 AM
...I think it's solvent pop...

No, definitely not solvent pop. Solvent pop appears more like small pimples.

Chris


(http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/gallery/9/2850-301217100136.jpeg)
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: 67gtasanjose on December 30, 2017, 12:24:46 PM
Hmmm...
This discussion is of huge interest to me. I have about 30-50% (maybe more) of the original drips and many are popped yet many are not. I also think a good number of the lower portions of the underbody, were scraped off in an accident I had when I landed the car really hard in the open deserts of the Mojave once...front frame rails were wiped clean (for instance) and some of the lower ribs were also wiped clean of the drips. I wouldn't mind putting back what would be typical.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: jwc66k on December 30, 2017, 12:52:04 PM
- the drips weren't so much drips as "drips that exploded after going through the baking process."
That actually made a lot of sense since a lot of the drips I've seen actually look like craters, rather than drips.
Yes it does.
The undercarriage pictures are from a 66 GT Fastback I sold in 2005 (San Jose March 28 - sched). With the car on jack stands, I spent some time on my back cleaning. I made no attempt to remove any drips.
Jim
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on December 30, 2017, 02:52:55 PM
No, definitely not solvent pop. Solvent pop appears more like small pimples.

Chris

I agree that all of the recent paint threads seem to indicate that solvent pop is usually very small.

But finish paint is not slathered on with giant nozzles and baked on to speed drying while the car is moving (I think).
Plus, the car primer/sealer application is upside down and the paint is already dripping off.
I have no idea how long the bake cycle was on the underside (or even the top) but it had to be fairly hot to get the primer to dry in the mere minutes allowed.

So if it isn't solvent pop, then it's something else in the paint reacting to the heat and exploding. The other thing it could be is water. The later seems a bit unlikely. It could just be the extreme temperature to which the dripping paint is exposed. Which brings me back to the most volatile agent in the paint coming out quickly.

I'm open to suggestions as to how to replicate this effect regardless of how it was initially created.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: DKutz on December 30, 2017, 05:17:42 PM
Seems like Virgina mustang, maple hill reproduced it in a recent Shelby.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: J_Speegle on December 30, 2017, 06:03:06 PM
Seems like Virgina mustang, maple hill reproduced it in a recent Shelby.

They may have just sprayed over the original surface (if its the car I'm thinking of) since it was doable on that car.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: J_Speegle on December 30, 2017, 06:13:22 PM
I'm open to suggestions as to how to replicate this effect regardless of how it was initially created.

Since we're just bench racing the idea lets me offer a couple of possibilities to start with and we can work though the good and bad points of each.

1- Do a base coat of primer to build up the product while the car is upright along one panel region to keep control and not let drying get ahead of us if we tried to do to large an area at one time.  Once the drips are set but not hard choice a random number to squish (if possible roll the car upside down) Given the size of the possible drips you would choose (the larger ones) you might use a wet pencil eraser since it has rounded edges and is approximately an acceptable size.  Might even experiment with cutting a pattern in the tip to produce those lines we see

Finish by feathering in the edges of the primer you used for the process

2-  Do the same process with just the floor color over the whole floor and frame (firewall rear ward or firewall forward) and depress a percentage of the drips. Problem I see with this methods is that the perfect time to do this will be very narrow and there is allot of area to cover but if you only do a couple dozen it might work.

Just some quick thoughts to get the discussion going. Wish I had the time to test out the possibilities on some of the floor panels laying around
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: DKutz on December 30, 2017, 08:19:36 PM
Here is the car
http://blog.virginiaclassicmustang.com/search?q=Drips

Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: J_Speegle on December 30, 2017, 08:34:03 PM
Here is the car
http://blog.virginiaclassicmustang.com/search?q=Drips

Different car but that is the pictures I think Bill and I were thinking of in the first couple of posts. Thanks
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: 1969 Cale II on December 30, 2017, 09:07:40 PM
I talked with people that worked at the Lorain Ohio plant that built my Cyclone, (Yes, from 1969). There was a guy in a pit that had to paint overhead to paint the bottoms of the cars and they had larger, more volume guns than we use to paint our cars. I used a 2 qt pressure pot to paint the bottom color on my Cyclone, that gun really puts out the paint and did a good job of runs and drips. Isn't just as simple as the drip drying out and shrinking back that causes the drip to look like that. From the vintage videos I have seen, the paint guns used in the auto industry are much higher volume than we have, the pattern is just huge. 3 passes and a panel is done. No HVLP gun I have used has that large of a pattern, nor would I want to. The learning curve on no runs might be tough.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on December 31, 2017, 04:27:33 AM
Thanks for the suggestions.
The Virginia Mustang car has the right flavor of pops, but a bit milder than some of the moon craters in other pics. But, perfectly satisfactory.
I've seen the videos of the painters slathering paint on -- that's an amazing amount of paint volume. I'll bet the undercar paint jets had some volume too.

I talked with my painter earlier this morning and he suggested about what Virginia did -- thinned epoxy primer -- but thought some localized heat might help. I'll try a few of these ideas in small scale and let you see some results in a few days.

If I could ever shake this lousy winter cold I might be able to get something done, so don't wait up.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Mike_B_SVT on January 01, 2018, 02:00:13 AM
I recall hearing from Adam at Mascar, that he would spray the underside with water before painting it in order to get drips that looked right.

I don't know if he had a layer of paint on it already, and then wet it and resprayed some more paint, or how exactly he did it.  But maybe you guys with experience will understand how that might work?
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on January 09, 2018, 08:11:04 PM
It's been slow going with some sore back issues.

But I had a chance to red oxide a spare rear floor section and then begin some experimenting.

I haven't had time for the drips to fully harden yet and recoat with red oxide, so here they are without a recoat.
I've used different tools and processes to create this variety -- yes, some are failures -- and thought I'd post to gather opinions before I either paint or build up some more.

Although I have a rotisserie, I decided to make the "drips" while the car sat normally. So I situated the spare rear floor panel above my head in order replicate how I will eventually do this.

The three numbers represent three different tools to make the dots.
The horizontal line represents no heat applied above the line, and a pinpoint butane torch applied to the dots to make them explode below the line.

(http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/gallery/9/4249-090118190812.jpeg)
 (http://www.concoursmustang.com/forum/gallery/9/4249-090118190812.jpeg)
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Brant on January 12, 2018, 08:57:40 PM
Sorry, I just saw this thread.

The drips made on 6S033 were duplicated by Jeremy at Maple Hill Restoration. It's been something that he has been messing with for a while. We were always afraid that the drips may remain "soft", but they turned out to be very hard and durable, just like you see with the original ones.

The epoxy primer was just thinned down and sprayed at the right consistency to work. The drips/bubbles just kind of collapsed, and we were really pleased with the way it turned out.

The top coat colors were then put on and the correct "look" was still there.

Here are a few pictures:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Jna8QyC3BwRNqRuFniIdnJ2m7qvOvL5Tw_xzXRs32KD_jg055iIW9Cr3wbYFiITRMcM3mk0cBcISbt0hylXkR4-OIN9h33KGtvsmnEPo1KUm9Hj3sTXwMyxuzcXAIc-MiKeZyVMTL5aJlszcY_LkZSQ-_aSZWHSOHefsGTOTZKLZaWkbZakE_8iEq4xzw6GgDUmOxPoJO_wq7TwYCW8Oxx5-PlKP2NurPt08Bxoi8Zthu3PnziOxl8efKbsRa1UUjBOLrebuiH8ZohBjrLIa7bAqO7sj24gIge2qpF7lShvU58elEaKjw4X9IudbipfVmeJNdvcmgjSSalHq3vEvLxB2L41LvTDmSl8OCUxwbFIW-lvjqmyi6uUUu_l3MhVzCgnI1r82wThtrFaTsh7ebJ9Xmz8KivSFtUTVZ5HSerUQmVRccgMTRONfqpVtfEObpseTeoEN-9UmQ3Gv2XIvhY3P2tGKs0vZAWaZxDwlYXjAijdgdGBg5KshkC7PFXuSdiz0vOMaCn1TCv6-cOwVRKvT-gcsfJOdajjOlVV_RGuzi9c33zVLbJHchLW6a-XS5Stg2WWgMwaRGiS2HOBdI9GlWYpbdcpKs3qYidVR=w600-tmp.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/e-mxDwSqz7Qheig3hQuCQUnD9KEgsKyOzMdYCgdvE_yNv6ObalZpH_eCRZ4_YGlxP7rP1OF4zwM9MsifftXtvv5k2M8ycS0AuVwZStNFCwoLo1NpY0RhsObEi87pJkie2xGVcpfnj_TmbalGEhZK87z26GOMRBYAZGgLohMwrIq7vvAieQMpdg-dB4L0bFo0OLBMYDmsqzFmQ89MPvlnmSL5YGwho-Tk0p7PIul_TDFDh83ipi47K4IZfrV-88QKfRuosPf3Ln0kYUMUKTGRF6pg2q7tB1TSpC0LHvZAu5dvfm3rqYiWLDHXFRuMj2_laCUmoEtjN7fiLEQuC09SEMGcmYs9BojRc9s-j76ugutfs2AaP5m-MGZ69UZP4ezuIh23IhEdyBPyXPZC-KUIPR94GXKL3N_q03ULtNpat9Vt2kzlmaopiP-gyoE31zvdZxCpu3bcZrTmt1TpDLMi2eGRVzctB8_Gj_QJJ0xo56HzPQLysRfERZRL_pTCpCD0F3QyH0HwOgOtywiH3ppXtRXS-GLIEpt0Yz-Z2nEzEeLpTt90eHyNAF5KBUVlzQPdnVFHg5yF_1cQ4YystrJaiRtigE_um_mOwT80EybM=w600-tmp.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/CK4mi-IXbOzpJa1KJjRlRVurAZFNDz6-gHxxU3SjXoBrt8zglLawPq5Ju9ubz4YmEhUT_7XCrotvHwvye3IhPvZ-zw33a3u1J4FUDW98Azxm2p-8EpmOuPcvps32Lu0zVsVjwibyYm4cbJEvEBc6AOm8CM1TUCVzeVw02SnaVnoRGYrSDDMo2MIms9tB_Pi5MUZSkIeuQ3i9aqj1sesgsagZyd32nlo8Ri8Z_PKSKI-JJWi7pMM0JJDJnuOY2fXZ05L51a6YreJdwd_Bo-0eVuo1KBsZEQJeUyNTes_TLZZJ_hUtO4hTsAjnMTkxcBs4LILm3nBjV-ZUKkR5hmko8oBbTNdEjqCr54k1IMmSQkAIX7TPtxzI6Vpj78RU-TwVM_l7aQoJrv7Gobr07Vi-9LSeB4RJpqTkiswKSO0ps3RotVC8Nmel9_GBGuLDpEUy_WnlR7-_mMJTcaPIwVGykOXRhn1bLG_Y1ZK2ksbjNDklI9JRnDBiQSvmVCrvqS8UAdAW3OZmNZjAVIUtSulrFYqp9AwA8TPBO8T3jYKlOvZJV7GJGbKO57GQXsb7AnFwMtsgGyO58szp-mCt5eGuKtK0Lvdr8-itq72F0bJx=w600-tmp.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/R2iO5hJ7B0V--pNoCA3C3fWc5C2pQPIp57Cgr5W2CkX63ZhMaldWLTNqHwO1uXrZlcnjdc1UKmCtkIrSGnHj0lXV_o16iAa9p5WpkKA-3CA8dNy5hAvb6SeHsmFycH-CGXApIEJWE8IqSn-DRBK8qX1BIyOZkLYtdjL17tg094eiVA3LJvbKei6a10M7Fj2wmuJMdSUMHM5ggLEpU_DbPra7PmTHDBGLq3hnLrKoeI0TKDNNmOQzVLY1wqZn7sc2ghvb8ptQQsFRoyngj637HE5zPP5Jrlaz1ZUXHvlOuPnX-ePs840a-exsvpPOJTkjNF-7od_65A9kn4l0V7NFq5C-KqwJbSOh8wn2iZ3gGWv84dG_Huw9Mcqg5NQSSCzX7GRu5aO8MMUZrGyFaY0qU3xYRVpTT_dnp7y4AeUH5TPnNpF_DsBL0aCBM_oetRtLv_ewNGt7xUXtLgMkCCcKDKoYebj7cw4rEbh4-kxdPs-4yr-lPBqIc3hi3qd7zDb22mWzkjNWpaWx0EJGILfrySzyqjsad26_2xZegYv1mq2tvO0fMW6dpwDPOyXkmkJsBG5sxR7DYyd3JnbI41FqDb6qKgKE2Qbc8Z9IRvzm=w600-tmp.jpg)


(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/WPw2uJeokwnK-AtoSW_Wk3qvw96rI4J7bvQypoZLXufKkSQlsZXzx57XJ1beULz5MrCbXfeubQQgg9YaJfSCSHee0ZZv9UgC2xF2sf6fR2iIaN_eRvBrVPONlB89E3NFGQ1ld7hUZfP_msSGgsog7LVOP6wZoyoHymew6I5PwSMaXwbq_x6_4ovc7DiYu2nCu4swVtCgXzZu392kXYX1xELoZyv5PUI-flfUqQoWdq64jhbmnCZryyHT1sh3fnlKy3g2awZVRu0Hl8HnQkRPXGOkyzdSbWXNejk9_mi7YsqqXZbjD5jSB2xhAEQwSygBaHi0q4l1wxeBIqlS7VQ0VFfBXy2j8DY1ZYsYCH1jo9aCz_3wmV73ErJp3Bb-gaNoqAm5QsfkmqB4VjLPAU9_TVMd0C40qnVjD3Z8d4_kLZeve7rsSpeJad2cI-aI5oCQmXQgqAyHZW2ZChYwARzkzSS-sk2uBBk-5rc-oAOLEne-eQwIYYhQN8ONXwHOXGR9KE1FlVrm7x5hS1un_5RrHwj-vqP1YCHK3qIbcheLoLVa2kdNX7FZIFd2QFMr6b3symOksZ6I9enG0XtHiUVRbJND5Rb6jK7vQ7rKUFo4AtCW6qdLpPsdimaOwjp6lRWD49pVLO-MdZvB0pvzqUkgSu51okwd-vowuQ=w600-tmp.jpg)
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on February 07, 2018, 07:38:34 PM
After having spent hours and hours on different processes and techniques, I think I have a method for creating faux drips. The best part is that I can choose where they go, and I can emulate the many different types of drips. I even have a process for the round circle drips!

It does rely on the car being on a rotisserie as the floor needs to face up. This process works best using gravity. I didn't want to spend even more time experimenting with more and more primer reduction on the real car -- and getting it wrong. I need to move on and this process should work for me.

Here is a pic where I used brown gloss paint to show the 'drips' as I didn't want to mix up DP. Ignore the lower left drip -- this was a test.
I think I'm on the right track ...





Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on February 09, 2018, 11:10:03 PM
Rotisserie assembled, car lifted and flipped.

Let the faux drip process begin!

Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: bryancobb on February 17, 2018, 08:04:03 AM
You Guys Crack Me Up ;D

The factories got these drips as a waste product of their paint process.  They achieved it unintentionally and it was created by unskilled, entry-level  undercarriage spray people who were even using "slop reclaimed paint" in some cases.  Because they were painting a generally unseen part of the car, their work was most likely not even inspected by QA. 

The most logical and easiest way to achieve factory-authentic results is to try and copy what was done at the plant.  The variables you will need to control are viscosity, temperature, volume deposited, smoothness of unpainted substrate, and rate of deposit.  Their guns probably sprayed near a gallon per minute.  Once the paint is in the belly and drips have formed, a large bed of heating element coils like a vacu-forming machine uses needs to be positioned about 12" beneath the floor and turned on to cure the floor at about 180-220 DegF.  This will boil the trapped solvent in the drips and make them POP like when cooking pancakes.  Smaller bubbles will pop differently than larger ones.  They will look different.  Really small bubbles will simply dry and harden without popping.

It won't be easy but it will be easier than "faking" them and getting an appearance that is less than optimum.  Once one person has success, their method will catch on like wild fire. :)

(http://www.nova-labs.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/IMG_5969.jpg)
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on February 17, 2018, 08:05:01 PM
I think everyone agrees this process involved fixed spray jets that hosed the primer on as the car went forward on a trolley.

After many hours of testing various paint mixes (a tremendous amount of reducer/solvent) I understand how much to put in the primer. I could also use a pressure pot and really slather this stuff on with the pot hooked up to my old Binks.

But I'm not interested in taping off that much of the shop in which I have the hoist. I'm also not interested in creating an oven under the car. Especially with all that solvent floating around.
I can paint my faux drips with a detail gun, not a sewer hose!

Like the wheel well undercoating process Jeff has created, which involves no tar based stuff of any kind, we are trying to duplicate what it looks like, not necessarily the way it was really done.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: caspian65 on February 17, 2018, 10:18:08 PM
+1 on fixed spray jets.  They usually started with a line directly vertical from the edge of the firewall.  The idea being so paint wouldn't be wasted by blowing up through the engine bay.  The front frame rails from that edge forward were normally done by hand, so we don't see the same type of drips as the belly of the car.

This level of detail is what separates good restorations from great restorations!
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: caspian65 on February 17, 2018, 10:21:45 PM
Hey Bryan... with a little patience, I believe the same forced heat method can be achieved with either large heat lamps or with a heat gun.  I like that mention of the bubbles popping.  Brant's car is a great example of the correct look.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: J_Speegle on February 18, 2018, 12:10:21 AM
I think everyone agrees this process involved fixed spray jets that hosed the primer on as the car went forward on a trolley.

+2 :)  This is backed up with examples where jets apparently plugged up and left a strip of bare steel for a section of floor.  Those bare sections are often very straight - something we would not expect or find if the car had been done by hand front he firewall rearward.  We also have some examples were the jets (all fo them ) just stopped at one point across the whole undercarriage suggesting the some one hit or struck the leaver that made contact with the dolly/trolley at that point shutting the jets off. In those cases the section of bare floor was corrected/fixed by hand
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Daven on February 18, 2018, 11:32:06 PM
I thought the complete car went through a submersion tank of primer like the old videos showed or were they just water washing tanks?

Daven

9R02R107xxx
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: caspian65 on February 18, 2018, 11:50:31 PM
I thought the complete car went through a submersion tank of primer like the old videos showed or were they just water washing tanks?

Not Mustangs.  Have heard some of the 'higher' end cars went through that type of process, like T-birds.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Daven on February 19, 2018, 12:03:33 AM
Oh, that explains why the cars I saw were full bodied.  Are the old mustangs considered the highest valued, or high end cars now?

Daven
9R02R107xxx
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: caspian65 on February 19, 2018, 12:18:29 AM
Oh, that explains why the cars I saw were full bodied.  Are the old mustangs considered the highest valued, or high end cars now?

Most likely, depending on the model/options.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: J_Speegle on February 19, 2018, 02:43:34 PM
Not Mustangs.  Have heard some of the 'higher' end cars went through that type of process, like T-birds.

+1   Mustangs were treated much like Falcons that they were based on (unibody design)
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: Bossbill on February 19, 2018, 06:27:58 PM
It's too cold to go to the shop today. Without drowning you guys in a bunch of detail ...

The May 1964 New Scientist explains that "the end of 1961 saw Dearborn using electro-coat painting for motor car wheels, with 4-5 million wheels painted by May of '64."

Before 1963 [exact date not mentioned] Ford was using "slipper dip" for primering the lower half of car bodies  for Lincoln and Thunderbird.
In October 1963 Ford's Halewood factory starting electro-coating these two car lines using 70,000 gallon vats of primer.

Cost and the availability of these vats in the many Mustang factories may have precluded their use.
Title: Re: Creating faux undercarriage paint drips
Post by: J_Speegle on February 19, 2018, 06:33:06 PM
Not sure if the earlier reports apply during the periods when Mustangs were produced. For examples the complete bodies of the other cars were dipped not just part of the bodies

Cost and the availability of these vats in the many Mustang factories may have precluded their use.

At least at most of the plants were Mustangs were produced the vats were in use on other lines within the same factory. Though I do agree that it was a cost saving item for these cheaper built cars to keep the prices down and the cars affordable/price competitive.