Author Topic: Fuse Box Lettering - How did they do it?  (Read 649 times)

Offline Bossbill

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Re: Fuse Box Lettering - How did they do it?
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2017, 07:12:49 PM »
Do note that these Deco pens are available in oil based or acrylic formula.
Oil would require a thinner -- acrylic is water based.

My wife has an extensive collection of paint brushes and paints for various hobbies.
I had dozens of brushes to pick from as well as dozens of paints.
I used a small hobby (like model car) brush and an acrylic paint.

If you have to buy something these look like a good deal. If I looked in a different drawer I might have found these!
Bill
Concours 3/2/67 GT350
Driven     6/6/70 0T02G160xxx B302
Modified  5/18/65 5F09A728xxx 2+2
Race       65 Coupe front clip, Convertible frame mods and SFCs; 2+2 conversion; Many 'glass parts

Offline suskeenwiske

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Re: Fuse Box Lettering - How did they do it?
« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2017, 02:25:44 PM »
A few things to note:

1) Oil Based works better on Chromed Metal Surfaces, such as Heater Control Knobs.

2) Be careful how much pressure you use to apply the paint. It prevents premature wear to the tip of the Marker and provides greater uniformity.

3) Sometimes it takes a couple of applications to get the results you need.

Ray
Ray
1965 Dearborn Coupe
6 Cylinder, AT, PB, PS, AC
Est. Build 23A

Offline midlife

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Re: Fuse Box Lettering - How did they do it?
« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2017, 02:49:11 PM »
I played around with the ink process, and found that the majority of the early fuse boxes that I have have raised letters, not recessed letters.  I guess there were at least two suppliers during this time.